Share Button

City Remembers The Fallen On Memorial Day

MEMORIAL DAY REMEMBRANCE – The city held its annual Memorial Day Parade and Observance Monday featuring a keynote address by Quincy attorney Thomas Kiley. Kiley, shown here addressing guests and spectators from the World War II podium at Mount Wollaston Cemetery, is a decorated Army veteran of the Vietnam War. The American flag flies at half staff until noon on Memorial Day. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

MEMORIAL DAY REMEMBRANCE – The city held its annual Memorial Day Parade and Observance Monday featuring a keynote address by Quincy attorney Thomas Kiley. Kiley, shown here addressing guests and spectators from the World War II podium at Mount Wollaston Cemetery, is a decorated Army veteran of the Vietnam War and graduate of North Quincy High School. The American flag flies at half staff until noon on Memorial Day and then is raised to full height from noon to sundown. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Quincy Veterans Services Grave Registration Officer George Bouchard (left) and Veterans Services Director George Nicholson, read the names of deceased local veterans who have passed away since Memorial Day last year. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Quincy Veterans Services Grave Registration Officer George Bouchard (left) and Veterans Services Director George Nicholson, read the names of deceased local veterans who have passed away since last Memorial Day. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Robert LaFleur, past commander, Morrisette American Legion and the Quincy Veterans Council, sounds taps after two memorial wreaths were placed at the Granite World War II Memorial at Mount Wollaston Cemetery during Monday's Memorial Day observance. The yellow star-shaped wreath in the center was placed at the memorial by Gold Star Mothers. More Memorial Day coverage in this week's Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Robert LaFleur, past commander, Morrisette American Legion and the Quincy Veterans Council, sounds taps after two memorial wreaths were placed at the granite World War II Memorial at Mount Wollaston Cemetery during Monday’s Memorial Day observance. The yellow star-shaped wreath and round red, white and blue wreath in the center were placed at the memorial by Gold Star Mothers. More Memorial Day coverage in this week’s Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Color guards from the  Quincy Police and Quincy Fire Department lead marchers along Coddington Street toward Mount Wollaston Cemetery during the city's annual Memorial Day Parade. Despite overcast skies and the threat of showers, about 500 people gathered at the cemetery to take part in the annual holiday observance. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Color guards from the Quincy Police and Quincy Fire Departments lead marchers along Coddington Street toward Mount Wollaston Cemetery during the city’s annual Memorial Day Parade. Despite the threat of showers, about 500 people gathered at the cemetery to take part in the annual holiday observance. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Veterans march along Coddington Street toward Mount Wollaston Cemetery and the annual Memorial Day observance at Mount Wollaston Cemetery. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Veterans march along Coddington Street toward Mount Wollaston Cemetery and the annual Memorial Day observance at Mount Wollaston Cemetery. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Other parade marchers included City Council President Kirsten Hughes (left) and her son John who wore his patriotic superhero Captain America costume. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Other parade marchers included City Council President Kirsten Hughes (left) and her son John who wore his patriotic superhero Captain America costume. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

 

 

 

 

Share Button

Memorial Day Parade, Ceremony Monday

 
Volunteers helped decorate veterans’ graves at Mount Wollaston Cemetery Saturday in advance of Monday’s Memorial Day Parade and Ceremony. About 4,500 veterans are buried at Mount Wollaston and another 3,500 are interred in other city cemeteries. Monday’s Memorial Day ceremony will take place at Mount Wollaston Cemetery. In the event of inclement weather, the ceremony will take place inside the Quincy High School gymasium. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Volunteers helped decorate veterans’ graves at Mount Wollaston Cemetery Saturday in advance of Monday’s Memorial Day Parade and Ceremony. About 4,500 veterans are buried at Mount Wollaston and another 3,500 are interred in other city cemeteries. Monday’s Memorial Day ceremony will take place at Mount Wollaston Cemetery. In the event of inclement weather, the ceremony will take place inside the Quincy High School gymasium. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Among the volunteers who helped place American flags at veterans' graves at Mount Wollaston Cemetery Saturday were Aoife Harris (left), age 2, and her mom, Maryellen Harris, both of Merrymount. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Among the volunteers who helped place American flags at veterans’ graves at Mount Wollaston Cemetery Saturday were Aoife Harris (left), age 2, and her mom, Maryellen Harris, both of Merrymount. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

By SCOTT JACKSON

Thomas Kiley, an attorney and Army veteran, will be the Keynote Speaker for Quincy’s Memorial Day Ceremonies on Monday, May 29, at Mount Wollaston Cemetery.

Kiley will speak from the cemetery’s World War II podium overlooking Sea Street following the city’s Memorial Day Parade, which steps off at 10:30 a.m. from Quincy Credit Union at 100 Quincy Ave. Assembly for the parade will begin at 10 a.m. in the bank’s parking lot.

The parade will travel along Quincy Avenue and Hancock Street to Coddington Street to Sea Street to the cemetery. All units will remain in formation during the ceremonies. The parade will rest at Quincy Square and wreaths will be placed on the tombs of John and John Quincy Adams.

The parade marshal and honor guests will review the parade at Sea Street opposite the cemetery.

Robert Lewis, commander of the Quincy Veterans’ Council, is the parade marshal. George Nicholson, director of veterans services for the city of Quincy and a past commander of the Quincy Veterans’ Council, is parade chairman and aide to Mayor Thomas Koch. George Bouchard, the city’s graves registration officer and a past commander of the QVC, is co-chairman of the parade. Leo Reardon and Marc Connolly, both past commanders of the QVC, are the officer of the day and sergeant at arms, respectively.

Friendly hug – Aoife Harris, age 2, and her friend, Patrick Croall, age 1 1/2, embrace after helping with placing some American flags at veterans' graves at Mount Wollaston Cemetery. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Friendly hug – Aoife Harris, age 2, and her friend, Patrick Croall, age 1 1/2, embrace after helping place some American flags at veterans’ graves at Mount Wollaston Cemetery. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Organizations and officials marching in the parade include:

Quincy Police Honor Guard; Quincy Fire Honor Guard; Quincy Rescue 1 and Ladder 1; Quincy Veterans’ Council Colors; Cyril P. Morrisette Post 294 AL; Lewis and the Quincy Veterans Councils’ senior and junior vice commanders Dan Tinney and Peter Walsh; Koch and Nicholson; city and state officials; the Quincy/North Quincy High School band; Second Marine Division Firing Squad; Robert I. Nickerson Post 382 AL; VFW Post 613; Windjammers Drum Squad; Quincy Post 95 AL; Quincy Cavanagh Chapter 79 DAV; Quincy Chapter VCVCAF; Houghs Neck Post 380 AL; and Jewish War Veterans 193.

Also taking part in the parade will be a trolley with veterans, Junior ROTC, the Defenders Marching Band, the USS Constitution Honor Guard, Gold Star families in vehicles, Patriot Brass Band, Norfolk County Sheriff’s Office; Naval Operational Support Center Quincy; the Pathfinders Marching Band, Boy and Girl Scouts, and Quincy National Guard 186.

Staff of the city’s veteran’s organizations are also invited. They include:

John McDonough, commander of the Bryan Post; Richard Keane, commander of the Morrisette Post; Gene Prorok, commander of the Quincy Post; Peter Walsh, commander of the Houghs Neck Post; James Doherty, commander of the Nickerson Post; Marthur Bumgardner, commander of the Wollaston Post; Dan Tinney, commander of the Cavanagh Chapter; Philip Singer, commander of the Memorial Post 7 AMVETS; Harvey Solomon, commander of the Jewish War Veterans Post; Dan Dewey, commandant of the Caddy Detachment; Lawrence Norton, president of the Quincy Chapter VCVCAF; and Vincent Dolan, president of the Second Marine Division Association.

Kiley is a 1964 graduate of North Quincy High School, where he was three-sport athlete. He served in the Army during the Vietnam War, and was wounded while fighting in Vietnam.

Kiley served as Massachusetts’ first assistant attorney general from 1977 to 1987 under then Attorney General Francis Bellotti. Since 1987, he has served as the head of the Boston office of the law firm of Cosgrove, Eisenberg & Kiley and has also been on the board of the Arbella Mutual Insurance Company since its founding in 1988.

Kiley received National Citizen of the Year awards from the U.S. Marshals Service in 1996 and the U.S. Department of Justice in 1997. In November 2016, the pole bearing the Massachusetts state flag at Creedon Field on the North Quincy High campus was dedicated to Kiley. During that dedication ceremony, Bellotti noted Kiley successfully argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in favor of a veterans’ preference law.

Others scheduled to speak at the Memorial Day ceremony include Koch; City Council President Kirsten Hughes; Nicholson; Lewis; Norton; the Rev. John Carl Swanson, chaplain of the Quincy Veterans’ Council, who will give the invocation and benediction.

The event will also include readings of Gen. John Logan’s 1868 order proclaiming Decoration Day and Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. Abigail Coughlin is set to sing “The Star Spangled Banner,” Hughes will sing “Amazing Grace,” and Robert LaFleur will sound “Taps.”

In the event of inclement weather, the ceremony will be held at 11 a.m. in the Quincy High gymnasium.  A decision regarding a parade cancellation is expected sometime Sunday afternoon. For more information call 617-376-1194.

Share Button

Police Recover Stolen David Ortiz Painting

Painting of David Ortiz stolen from the Crane Library was recovered by Quincy police. Photo courtesy Quincy Police Department.

Painting of David Ortiz stolen from the Crane Library was recovered by Quincy police. Photo courtesy Quincy Police Department.

By SCOTT JACKSON

Quincy police recovered a stolen painting of retired Red Sox slugger David Ortiz valued at $1,000 that was taken earlier this month from the Thomas Crane Public Library.

The painting, by local artist Edwina Caci, had been on display at the library and gone missing sometime after May 7. On Wednesday, a security guard at the library notified police that he had found video footage of the painting being stolen, adding that the suspect had also just entered the library.

Police responded to the scene and spoke with the suspect, identified as Dana Bognar, a 37-year-old homeless man. Bognar told police that a friend of his, James Perkins, asked him to steal the painting and offered Bognar $20 to do so. Police said Bognar admitted taking the painting on May 16 and later gave it to Perkins.

Bognar was arrested and charged with larceny from a building and conspiracy to commit larceny. A warrant has been issued for the arrest of Perkins, age 48, of Broad Street, for receiving stolen property and conspiracy to commit larceny.

Officers were able to determine who was in possession of the painting and recover it from that person. Police do not believe the person found in possession of the painting knew it was stolen.

Share Button

Police Seek Armed Robbery Suspect

By SCOTT JACKSON

The Quincy Police Department is seeking the public’s help in identifying the woman robbed a waitress at knifepoint inside a Wollaston restaurant.

Surveillance picture of the suspect.

Surveillance picture of the suspect.

The incident occurred around 8 p.m. on Sunday in the Friendly’s at 699 Hancock St. Police said the suspect approached the waitress and asked her to help her to the bathroom because she was blind. When they reached the bathroom door, the suspect pulled out a black knife and demanded the victim’s money. The suspect then left the restaurant on foot, headed southbound on Hancock Street.

Police described the victim as a white female with a medium build and dark hair. She was wearing black pants and a black jacket with a pink t-shirt underneath. Witnesses told police the suspect appeared to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol at the time of the robbery.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Det. William Monteith at wmonteith@quincyma.gov or 617-745-5767. Tips may also be submitted using the MyPD app.

Share Button

Councillors Voice Concerns Over Traffic, Parking

By SCOTT JACKSON

Several councillors on Wednesday night criticized the city department responsible for traffic and parking for not having a better plan to deal with those issues throughout Quincy.

The council’s finance committee met Wednesday to review a slate of departmental budgets, including the budget for the Traffic, Parking, Alarm and Lighting Department, as part of its ongoing review of Mayor Thomas Koch’s proposed $299.43 million spending plan for fiscal year 2018, which starts July 1.

The TPAL Department would see its budget increase to $2.8 million under Koch’s proposal, which would allow the department to hire a second junior traffic engineer. The department was created in the current fiscal year and presently has a budget of $2.5 million.

Michael Coffey, who oversees the department, came under criticism at the budget hearing for saying TPAL alone would not be able to solve the city’s traffic and parking woes. He said a collaborative effort, undertaken as part of a $2.3 million traffic and parking study Koch has included in his latest capital plan, is needed to do so.

“Many of the issues that we’re facing today are a reflection of growth and change over the last 30 or 40 years. I would like to give you a plan that says we’re going to fix everything in the next fiscal year, but that’s unrealistic,” Coffey said.

“It’s going to take a very good plan, put together with a lot of input from community members and a lot of experts…It will take your involvement and your support. It will need funding. This is not the responsibility of the TPAL Department to fix all the traffic and parking issues. It’s your responsibility. It’s my responsibility. It’s the mayor’s responsibility. It’s the community’s responsibility.”

Ward 3 Councillor Ian Cain said he understand Coffey might not have all the answers to the traffic and parking problems, but said the department should have at least some solutions.

“The most pertinent issues we have right now are Quincy as a whole is under construction and families have four and five cars, so what are we going to do to alleviate some of that problem? You’re not going to solve it, but I can’t believe you didn’t have anything,” Cain said.

“There’s no idea, no concept…That’s crazy. That’s disturbing, because these are some of the greatest issues we have. If we don’t have the faintest idea how to solve them, then we’re in deep, deep trouble.”

Cain asked that the council’s vote on the TPAL budget be put on hold until Coffey and the department could provide more information – such as goals or a mission statement. Cain’s colleagues agreed with the request, and the TPAL budget will be reviewed again on June 5, the next time the council is set to meet.

Other councillors raised concerns about traffic and parking at the meeting as well.

Ward 4 Councillor Brian Palmucci said he would oppose the $2.3 million traffic and parking study the mayor has proposed and would rather give TPAL more funds to hire additional traffic engineers. The department currently has a traffic engineer and one junior engineer, and the budget proposal would allow for the hiring of a second junior engineer, which Palmucci called a baby step in the right direction.

“I think we need more traffic engineers in the city. I don’t think we need a citywide traffic study,” Palmucci said.

“I think that’s great when we’re all out there campaigning this election we can say ‘we’re going to take a look at everything – citywide traffic study,’ and then in two years nothing will change. We’re going to know what the problems are, but we’re going to have no plan to fix them and even if there is a plan to fix them in that citywide traffic study, you don’t have the resources currently to do it.”

Ward 1 Councillor Margaret Laforest voiced her support for the traffic study, but said its recommendations need to be implemented in a timely fashion.

“The citywide traffic study is something I do support because I see the resources are not available in house and we’ve been making these one-off, squeaky-wheel requests,” she said.

“I do see that as a necessity for the community, but to Councillor Palmucci’s point, let’s not put together a binder on the shelf…let’s get these things implemented because we can’t afford to wait.”

Coffey said the department would not wait until the study is completed to move forward on recommendations, but would move forward with them as soon as possible.

Councillor Noel DiBona questioned by Coffey – who was previously the business manager for the Department of Public Works – was not joined by Deborah Finnigan, the city’s traffic engineer, at Wednesday night’s meeting or a previous budget session on May 12.

“Where is the traffic engineer? Why isn’t she right next to you answering some of these questions? She’s the expert,” DiBona said. “I would like to have asked her what kind of proposals did she have to make traffic better, what kind of studies has she done, is she traveling around the city.”

Coffey said she was unavailable for Wednesday’s meeting because of a family commitment.

Share Button