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Hancock – Adams Common Construction Zone Expanding

Sidewalks Closure USE

The work zone for the Hancock Adams Common construction project will expand Monday temporarily closing two sidewalks in the area for up to six weeks, officials announce.

Starting Monday, May 21, the sidewalk on the west side of Temple Street, adjacent to the work zone, between the Burgin & Platner Building and the United First Parish Church, will be temporarily closed.  Access for businesses within the Burgin & Platner Building will remain open during this time; however through pedestrian traffic to Hancock Street and Washington Street will be redirected to the sidewalk on the east side of Temple Street.

The raised crosswalk on Temple Street will also be temporarily closed.

Pedestrian traffic to and from Washington Street and Hancock Street shall utilize the eastern sidewalk on Temple Street and shall utilize the crosswalks at the intersection of Washington St. and Temple St. (adjacent to UFPC) as well as the crosswalk at the intersection of Temple St. and Hancock St. (adjacent to the Stop & Shop Headquarters Building).

Pedestrian access to Quincy City Hall, the Quincy Center MBTA Station and the United First Parish Church will remain unchanged.

The section of sidewalk on the west side of Temple Street, between the Burgin & Platner Building and United First Parish Church, will remain closed to pedestrian through traffic for approximately six weeks, and is expected to re-open in early July.

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Quincy Center T Station Closed This Weekend

The Quincy Center garage demolition is underway and mostly occurring during regular work hours, T officials said Wednesday. This coming weekend, however, the contractor will be working from Friday night, May 18 at 9 p.m. until the 4 a.m. on Monday, May 21.

Weekend work is required to remove the northern portion (helix ramp) of the garage that is over or near the railroad right-of-way. This will be the only weekend work for the spring/summer period at Quincy Center. shuttle bus service will be in place.

Additional weekend work will be required to demolish the southern section, however, those weekends will be scheduled in the fall.

T officials hand-delivered flyers regarding the weekend work to the residents and businesses in the area and placed the information on the web:  https://www.mbta.com/projects/wollaston-station-improvements/update/demolition-quincy-center-garage

As you know, the busway area has been reduced to establish a safe work area for the contractor adjacent to the garage, therefore, pick-up and drop off is live and limited to 5 minutes.  We appreciate your cooperation.

A weekly one-week look ahead and monthly construction photos for Wollaston and Quincy Center on the web: https://www.mbta.com/projects/wollaston-station-improvements/update/construction-1-week-look-ahead.

The Wollaston Shuttle bus service continues to/from the Wollaston area to North Quincy and Quincy Center Red Line Stations: https://www.mbta.com/projects/wollaston-station-improvements/update/how-the-wollaston-station-closure-affects-your-trip.

The next Wollaston Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) meeting will be held on Wednesday, June 20 at 6:30 PM at Quincy City Hall.  Meetings are open to the public. To see the last PowerPoint presentation from the March meeting: https://www.mbta.com/events/2018-03-28/wollaston-community-advisory-committee-meeting

Please continue to be in contact with us at Wollaston@mbta.com regarding any issues or concerns with the shuttle bus service, Wollaston Station construction or the Quincy Center Garage demolition project.

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Koch In, Tsaffaras Out At Quincy College

By SCOTT JACKSON

Mayor Thomas Koch on Tuesday was named the interim leader of Quincy College following the resignation of Peter Tsaffaras, the college’s president, and Thomas Feenan, the chairman of the board overseeing the school.

The college’s Board of Governors voted to designate Koch the principle executive of the college, effective immediately, assuming all responsibilities of the school’s president for up to six months while due diligence is exercised for a presidential search.

Quincy College is municipally owned but had gained a large amount of independence from the city in the decades since its founding; the school does not receive money from the city or state and is instead funded by tuition and other revenue sources. Koch said he asked to be named the school’s acting president given the seriousness of the college’s current situation.

“While the college has rightly gained a large degree of autonomy over the years, it remains a department of the city of Quincy,” Koch said in a statement following the board’s vote. “This unprecedented request I made this evening reflects the seriousness with which I and many others view the college’s current situation. I will make decisions based on what I believe to be the best interests of the college and our city.

“And I wish to be abundantly clear about one thing: By taking this action, I stand fully accountable for the future of this institution.”

Koch said he would be “building a leadership and response team that addresses the myriad of challenges facing the college, both short- and long-term,” in the coming days.

“This will include the recovery of the college’s nursing program, the protection of its finances, and repairing the relationships between the college and its students, parents, state agencies and the community as a whole,” the mayor said.

Koch plans to address the college’s Board of Governors next week.

“We will act transparently and my administration is prepared to take immediate steps to begin to reassure the college community that there is no challenge that cannot be resolved and that the future of this institution is absolutely critical to this community,” he said.

Tsaffaras, the school’s president since 2011, announced his resignation at the start of Tuesday’s Board of Governors meeting. He said the decision to resign had been made during a May 3 meeting of the governors behind closed doors.

In his resignation letter, Tsaffaras said discord with some members of the Board of Governors – and not a state board’s revocation of the college’s nursing program on May 9, which the college is appealing – prompted him to leave his post.

“I believe that the fissure and division between the Board of Governors and myself would make it difficult to continue to move forward my agenda and vision for the college,” Tsaffaras said.

“Staying in this position without the support of the board would not only delay the college’s forward progress but also, in ways large and small, have a negative impact upon the students, faculty, staff, and administration. As someone who has worked in higher education since June of 1972, just shy of 46 years, I find that alternative to be simply unacceptable.”

Tsaffaras’ resignation is effective June 1. The Board of Governors, however, voted in executive session to place Tsaffaras on administrative leave effectively immediately through the end of his tenure, according to Christopher Bell, the board’s first vice chair. Bell emphasized the decision to place Tsaffaras on leave was not a disciplinary measure.

The decision to place Tsaffaras on administrative leave led to the resignation of Feenan. Feenan left the boardroom about an hour into the executive session and announced, “I just quit.”

“After 11 years on this board, I can’t work with them anymore,” Feenan told those gathered outside the boardroom. “This is outrageous what they’ve just done. They’ve destroyed the school.”

Feenan had served on the board since 2007 and had been its chair since September 2014. He had been a staunch supporter of Tsaffaras in recent weeks as other board members called for the president to be terminated.

Bell chaired the remainder of the meeting after Feenan’s departure. All told, the governors sat in executive session for more than two hours Tuesday. Tsaffaras joined them for the first 80 minutes or so of the closed-door meeting, as did several other college officials. Also present at the meeting were City Solicitor Jim Timmins and Chris Walker, Koch’s director of policy and information.

Board members deliberated over pizza and were at times animated during the executive session, which could be seen, but not heard, by those waiting in the next room.

The vote to name Koch acting president was made in an open session following the conclusion of the closed-door meeting. Joseph Shea, a Norfolk County Commissioner and former Quincy city clerk, made the motion to name Koch to that post and it was seconded by Paul Barbadoro. The board voted 9-1 to make Koch acting president, with Barbara Clarke opposed.

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Kevin Carey Named QHS Head Football Coach

Kevin Carey has been named head coach of the Quincy High School varsity football team. Carey, a defensive coordinator, succeeds Bill Reardon who resigned as head coach earlier this year.

Kevin Carey

Kevin Carey

Carey is no stranger to the Presidents gridiron program. A 1994 Quincy High School graduate, Carey played high school football and was inducted into the Quincy-North Quincy Football Hall of Fame in 2010. He played football collegiately at Fitchburg State where he graduated in 1999.

Carey has been employed in the Quincy Public School system for 18 years, most recently dean at Quincy High for the past eight years.

He started his high school football coaching career as a freshman coach for two years before moving on as a JV coach for eight years. For the past 10 years he was the defensive coordinator for the varsity program.

Carey and Quincy High School Athletic Director Kevin Mahoney will be working together to finalize his support staff in all levels, Mahoney said Tuesday.

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QHS 10th Annual Fashion Show

 

Quincy High School's 10th annual fashion show was held Thursday night in the Lloyd Hill Auditorium. More than 100 students modeled fashions created by their classmates. Here the entire ensemble of student models and creators take a bow after the 90-minute show. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Quincy High School’s 10th annual fashion show was held Thursday night in the Lloyd Hill Auditorium. More than 100 students modeled fashions created by their classmates. Here the entire ensemble of student models and creators take a bow after the 90-minute show. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Student designer Kelly Vo (left) with fellow classmates who modeled her creations at Quincy High School's 10th annual fashion show Thursday. Student models are Kari Wismar, Peggy Tam, Sabrina Pinto, Maggie O'Leary, Katie Lynch and Stela Cala. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Student designer Kelly Vo (left) with fellow classmates who modeled her creations at Quincy High School’s 10th annual fashion show Thursday. Student models are Kari Wismar, Peggy Tam, Sabrina Pinto, Maggie O’Leary, Katie Lynch and Stela Cala. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Eco-friendly fashions created with recycled and reclaimed materials were featured at the 10th annual Quincy High School fashion show. From left: Houda Haiti wears a dress fashioned from aluminum foils and water bottles designed by Mariam Khamis; Colleen McGee in denim pants and recycled t-shirts designed by Jania Desrosiers and Crystal Zeng; and Kat Casey wearing a bath robe created with fabric scraps by Catheleen Veiga. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Eco-friendly fashions created with recycled and reclaimed materials were featured at the 10th annual Quincy High School fashion show. From left: Houda Haiti wears a dress fashioned from aluminum foils and water bottles designed by Mariam Khamis; Colleen McGee in denim pants and recycled t-shirts designed by Jania Desrosiers and Crystal Zeng; and Kat Casey wearing a bath robe created with fabric scraps by Catheleen Veiga. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Styling in swimwear created by designer Kat Casey are Gretah DiOrio and Leo Burns at Thursday's QHS fashion show. More photos in the May 17th issue of The Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Styling in swim and beach clothing created by designer Kat Casey are Gretah DiOrio and Leo Burns at Thursday’s QHS fashion show. More photos in the May 17th issue of The Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

 

 

 

 

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