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Faith Lutheran Church Time Capsule Opened

Workers from M.G. Foley Construction Company carefully remove mortar that sealed in a time capsule in the cornerstone of Faith Lutheran Church in Quincy. The time capsule – a copper strong box – was placed in the cornerstone in 1892 - the year the church was built. Opening the time capsule Saturday was part of the church's 125th anniversary celebration this week. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Workers from M.G. Foley Construction Company carefully remove mortar that sealed in a time capsule in the cornerstone of Faith Lutheran Church in Quincy. The time capsule – a copper strong box – was placed in the cornerstone in 1892 – the year the church was built. Opening the time capsule Saturday was part of the church’s 125th anniversary celebration this week. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Unfortunately, the copper box holding artifacts from the year 1892 was not properly sealed. Over time, moisture and eventually mold spoiled some of the contents inside the box including local and Boston newspapers and a Swedish hymnal book. Here church member Jack Mayo holds the time capsule aloft shortly after its lid was removed. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Unfortunately, the copper box holding artifacts from the year 1892 was not properly sealed. Over time, moisture and eventually mold spoiled some of the contents inside the box including local and Boston newspapers and a Swedish hymnal book. Here church member Jack Mayo holds the time capsule aloft moments after its lid was removed. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Jack Mayo wears white gloves to protect his hands from the soggy contents of the Faith Lutheran Church 122-year-old time capsule. Off to the right are several Swedish coins from the year 1892 that were inside the copper box. Story, other photos in this week's Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Jack Mayo wears white gloves to protect his hands from the moldy paper contents of the Faith Lutheran Church 122-year-old time capsule. Off to the right are several Swedish coins from the year 1892 that were inside the copper box. Some items were also found behind the cornerstone including an incandescent light bulb from the early 1890s. Story, other photos in this week’s Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

 

 

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North Quincy Falls To Middleboro, 34-6

Eddie Hart scored two touchdowns and kicked four extra points to lead undefeated Middleboro to a 34-6 win over North Quincy in a Patriot League Fisher Division game at Veterans’ Memorial Stadium Friday night.

Aidan Brown scored North’s touchdown on a 52-yard run from scrimmage on the first play of the second half. Quarterback Andrew Kiley was 12-16 for 103 yards for North.

Middleboro is 6-0.

North Quincy is 2-4 and travels to Scituate next Friday.

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Quincy Crushes Hingham, 47-7

Quincy's John Teixeira splits two Hingham defenders and races 44 yards for a touchdown in the Presidents 47-7 win over the Harbormen on the road Friday night. Quincy improves to 6-0 on the season and will host Duxbury next Friday night at Veterans' Memorial Stadium. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Quincy’s John Teixeira splits two Hingham defenders and races 44 yards for a touchdown in the Presidents’ 47-7 win over the Harbormen on the road Friday night. Quincy improved to 6-0 on the season and will host Duxbury next Friday night at Veterans’ Memorial Stadium. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

J.T. Bain hauls in one of his two touchdown receptions from quarterback James Lam in Quincy's 47-7 win over Hingham Friday night. Lam threw three touchdown receptions - 10 and 4 yards to Bain and a 31-yard strike to Reda Laftih  - and also ran for a 29 yards for another score. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

J.T. Bain hauls in one of his two touchdown receptions from quarterback James Lam in Quincy’s 47-7 win over Hingham Friday night. Lam threw three touchdown receptions – 10 and 4 yards to Bain and a 31-yard strike to Reda Laftih – and also ran for 29 yards for another score. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Reda Laftih catches a 31-yard pass from James Lam for a Presidents' touchdown. Quincy Sun photo/Robert Bosworth

Reda Laftih catches a 31-yard pass from James Lam for a Presidents’ touchdown. Quincy Sun photo/Robert Bosworth

 

Quincy's defense also scored two touchdowns against Hingham. Here Kenny Garcia Rosario returns an interception for 56 yards for a Presidents' touchdown. Rich Turpin recovered a fumble and raced 35 yards for the other score. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Quincy’s defense also scored two touchdowns against Hingham. Here Kenny Garcia Rosario returns an interception 56 yards for a Presidents’ touchdown. Rich Turpin recovered a fumble and raced 35 yards for the other score. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

 

 

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City Optimistic On Teel Field Permitting

By SCOTT JACKSON

City officials are optimistic they will be able to work with the state’s environmental agency to receive the proper permitting for a $12 million project to renovate Teel Field and create a new parking lot for North Quincy High School.

The Quincy Conservation Commission had given its approval to the project, but the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) issued a superseding order denying the permit. MassDEP did so because the city did not submit the signatures of affected homeowners on Hunt Street and Newbury Avenue. The letter also identified other issues the city should correct in its next application.

Following MassDEP’s decision, Chris Walker, a spokesman for Mayor Thomas Koch, said the city would be able to work with MassDEP on the permitting process.

“These are almost all fairly routine issues raised by the DEP when you’re permitting a major drainage improvement project like this, and it’s nothing that cannot be addressed. It’s sort of the nature of the beast, and you just work through it with the DEP and any other of the myriad of regulators that get involved in a project of this scope,” Walker said.

“None of the DEP’s comments change the end result of a first-class and much-needed playing field for our young people and a drainage system that will help alleviate long-standing neighborhood flooding problems that had been ignored for far too long.”

Rachel Freed, the acting deputy regional director for MassDEP’s Bureau of Resource Protection, said the city should seek a new notice of intent (NOI) from the Conservation Commission after the resolving ownership issues for the properties in question.

“After discussions with the applicant’s consultant, who confirmed that written permission from the landowners had not been submitted with the NOI, and further, that negotiations with some of the property owners were ongoing, MassDEP has determined that a Superseding Order of Conditions denying the project should be issued,” Freed wrote in a letter dated Oct. 7.

“MassDEP recommends that the applicant file a new Notice of Intent with the Quincy Conservation Commission after all land ownership issues have been resolved.”

Freed’s letter to the city also cited technical problems with the original notice of intent she said should be addressed in a new filing. The city, she said, should seek a review from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to determine if a water quality certificate is needed from the state and provide additional details on the proposed stormwater design, among other reasons.

Koch unveiled his plans for the $12 million project, which includes renovations to Teel Field, the creation of a new 157-parking lot, and new retaining ponds to address flooding problems, during a public meeting last winter at North Quincy High. The City Council approved the project in an 8-0 vote in June; Councillor Doug Gutro was not present at that meeting.

Since then, the city has finalized the purchase of six of the nine Hunt Street and Newbury Avenue homes it plans to raze to make way for the project. Quincy has paid a combined $2.945 million for those properties, according to the Norfolk County Registry of Deeds’ database.

Former Mayor William Phelan, an attorney representing Lawrence and Vicki Tasney at 30 Hunt St., told The Sun Oct. 6 that the family never intended to sell their house and just wants to stay in their home.

Koch has said he would not use eminent domain to force the Tasneys out of that home, and would build the project around the site if needed. Joseph Ferson, a spokesman for MassDEP, would not say Wednesday whether or not the project could go forward without the Tasneys’ approval if the project were redesigned around their property.  He said that was only a hypothetical question at this point.

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John Adams Birthday Anniversary Ceremony Oct. 30

The 47th annual Presidential Wreath Laying Ceremony honoring the life of John Adams, Second President of the United States, will be held at United First Parish Church on Thursday, Oct. 30 at noon.

The church is located at 1306 Hancock Street in Quincy, directly across from City Hall.  The ceremony marks the 279 birthday anniversary of John Adams who was born on October 30, 1735.

The public is invited to attend and admission if free.

Commander Eric Vandiver from the Navy Operational Support Center Quincy will present the wreath on behalf of President Barack Obama, and the Navy Honor Guard will place it on the tomb of John Adams located beneath the church sanctuary.

Speakers commemorating the life of John Adams will be the Honorable Thomas Koch, Mayor of Quincy, Douglas Adams, representing the Adams Family, Rev. Sheldon Bennet, PH.D., Minister Emeritus, United First Parish Church, Rev. Rebecca Froom, Minister, United First Parish Church, and students from the Woodward School, North Quincy High School and Quincy High School.  The Navy Band Northeast, Newport RI, and the Quincy Choral Society will be performing during the ceremony.

For more information, call 617-773-0062 or visitorsprogram@ufpc.org.

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