WWI ‘Doughboy’ Statue Moved To New Location

World War I 'Doughboy' statue shown here outside the Adams Academy was moved Tuesday to the corner of Furnace Brook Parkway and Hancock Street. Quincy Sun File Photo/Robert Bosworth

World War I ‘Doughboy’ statue shown here outside the Adams Academy was moved Tuesday to the corner of Furnace Brook Parkway and Hancock Street. Quincy Sun File Photo/Robert Bosworth

Paul Franz from the Quincy Park Department (left) manages the move of the World War I Doughboy statue to its new location at the intersection of Hancock Street and Furnace Brook Parkway Tuesday. Photo by Lisa Aimola for the Mayor’s Office.

Paul Franz from the Quincy Park Department (left) manages the move of the World War I Doughboy statue to its new location at the intersection of Hancock Street and Furnace Brook Parkway Tuesday. Photo by Lisa Aimola for the Mayor’s Office.

By SCOTT JACKSON

The Doughboy Statue, which honors Quincy residents who served and died in World War I, has been moved to a new location at the corner of the Furnace Brook Parkway and Hancock Street.

The statue moved to the new pocket park at that intersection from its longtime home in front of the Adams Academy, which houses the Quincy Historical Society, Tuesday.

Chris Walker, a spokesman for Mayor Thomas Koch, said the mayor and the Quincy Historical Society had been discussing the relocation of the statue for some time. The two sides felt the statue was not a good fit for the Adams Academy, because it was not original to the building.

“The statue is a pretty dramatic feature and the mayor and the historical society thought it would be more appropriate at its new location,” Walker said. “The pocket park will essentially be the World War I Doughboy Park.”

Quincy artist Bruce Wilder Saville designed the Doughboy Statue, which was commissioned in 1925. Saville was a veteran of World War I and worked on several other memorials throughout the country, including one in Columbus, Ohio, while head of the art department at Ohio State University.

The Adams Academy, 8 Adams St., is the site of John Hancock’s birthplace. The academy located there – funded by a trust established by John Adams – opened its doors in 1872 and closed in 1907. The Quincy Historical Society now operates a museum, research library and gift shop on site.

The doughboy statue was a focal point of the city’s annual Veterans Day ceremonies in November for many years with memorial wreaths placed near its base.

George Nicholson, director of Quincy Veterans Services, told the Sun Tuesday that a change in location for the Veterans Day ceremony has not been considered yet by the Quincy Veterans Council.

The city’s Memorial Day ceremonies are held at the World War II granite memorial at Mount Wollaston Cemetery in May.

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