Gasoline Prices Rise Four Cents

Gasoline prices in Massachusetts are up four cents this week, but still remain below the national average, according to AAA Northeast.

AAA’s April 25th survey of prices in Massachusetts finds self-serve, regular unleaded averaging $2.12 per gallon, four cents higher than last week. The Massachusetts price is two cents below the national average for regular unleaded of $2.14. A year ago at this time, the average price in Massachusetts was 42 cents higher at $2.54.

The range in prices in the latest AAA survey for unleaded regular is 30 cents, from a low of $1.99 to a high of $2.29. AAA advises motorists to shop around for the best prices in their area, and to make sure they and their passengers buckle up — every time.

Today’s local gas prices and their ranges are as follows:

Self Serve                                           Grade

$2.12  ($1.99-$2.29)                                         Regular Unleaded

$2.36  ($2.17-$2.69)                                         Midgrade Unleaded

$2.52  ($2.29-$2.99)                                         Premium Unleaded

$2.21  ($2.05-$2.49)                                         Diesel

Find the most up-to-date local gas prices with the AAA Fuel Finder by logging onto AAA.com and clicking on Gas Saving Tips & Tools.

AAA Northeast is a not-for-profit auto club with 62 offices in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Jersey, New Hampshire and New York, providing more than 2 million local AAA members with travel, insurance, finance, and auto-related services.

Share Button

National Work Zone Awareness Week

National Grid is taking part in National Work Zone Awareness Week, which takes place April 11-15. National Work Zone Awareness Week is an annual campaign by the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration at the start of spring construction season to encourage safe driving through work sites.

With spring construction season underway, the public will see National Grid crews working on infrastructure upgrades that will require roadway work zone areas. For the safety of the public and its employees, National Grid is reminding drivers of the importance of slowing down when approaching these work zones. Observing all safety warnings is critically important to the safety of utility and other roadside work crews.
According to the most recent data available from the National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse, nearly 700 people were killed in roadway work zones in 2014. In New England, since 2014, National Grid has had 22 encroachments on its work zones by either motor vehicle or pedestrian.
National Grid’s workers go through extensive training on work zone safety, but it’s equally important to remind the public about important safety tips. High-visibility garments and sufficient work zone lighting help improve worker visibility in work zones and help create a safer environment for both workers and motorists. Additionally, National Grid has started using illuminated “stop” and “slow” signs to increase the visibility of electric and gas crews.
National Grid offers motorists the following tips to maintain safety near utility crew work zones:
  • Slow down and stay alert to the warning signs and traffic regulators.
  • Merge as soon as possible. Do not wait until the last second. This will help to keep traffic flowing smoothly.
  • Pay attention as heavy machinery and crews are in close proximity to your vehicle.
  • Keep a safe distance between you and the vehicle in front of you, as well as any traffic barriers, construction vehicles/equipment and workers.
  • Plan ahead and leave extra time if you know you will be driving through a work zone.
  • Slow down immediately when you see indicators of roadside work in progress and always leave plenty of braking time between you and the car in front of you. A vehicle going 60 mph travels 88 feet per second.
  • Please have patience. National Grid personnel are working to improve the safety and reliability of your energy network. Cutting off other motorists, traveling at high speeds and ignoring posted warnings all serve to further slow the flow of traffic and to endanger everyone in the area.
Work Zone Awareness Safety Video
A National Grid work zone awareness safety video has been developed for media use here.
Share Button

Gasoline Prices Up Sixth Straight Week

Gasoline prices in Massachusetts are up for the sixth straight week, and have reached two dollars for the first time since last December, according to AAA Northeast.

AAA’s April 11 survey of prices in Massachusetts finds self-serve, regular unleaded averaging $2.00 per gallon, two cents higher than last week and 30 cents higher than five weeks ago. The Massachusetts price is four cents below the national average for regular unleaded of $2.04. A year ago at this time, the average price in Massachusetts was 34 cents higher at $2.34.

The range in prices in the latest AAA survey for unleaded regular is 30 cents, from a low of $1.89 to a high of $2.19. AAA advises motorists to shop around for the best prices in their area, and to make sure they and their passengers buckle up — every time.

Today’s local gas prices and their ranges are as follows:

Self Serve                                           Grade

$2.00  ($1.89-$2.19)                                         Regular Unleaded

$2.25  ($2.09-$2.59)                                         Midgrade Unleaded

$2.41  ($2.19-$2.74)                                         Premium Unleaded

$2.16  ($1.98-$2.49)                                         Diesel

Find the most up-to-date local gas prices with the AAA Fuel Finder by logging onto AAA.com and clicking on Gas Saving Tips & Tools.

Share Button

BBB Warns Consumers Of Door-To-Door Scammers

Better Business Bureau Serving E. MA, ME, RI & VT (BBB) is warning consumers to beware of scammers going door-to-door with different scams to steal personal information and money.

While some salespeople may be trustworthy, working for legitimate businesses, there are also scammers out there “posing” as them. Many consumers report con artists offering lawn care or discounted paving services this time of year.

Consumers report door-to-door salespeople offering to pave their driveways or complete other outside maintenance and ask for payment upfront for materials. In some cases, scammers take the money and are never seen again or start the job and never finish. It’s important to know what to look for when being approached by these scammers to keep you and your property safe.

BBB offers tips for dealing with door-to-door salespeople:

Do your research. If a person is selling lawn care or discounted paving services, you can always tell the person you’re interested, but to come back another time. This way you have time to look up their business at bbb.org.

Don’t fall for high-pressure sales tactics. If a salesperson is making you feel uncomfortable on your own property, whether it be by aggressive selling or pitching a personal sob story, remember that they are on your property and you can ask them to leave.

Never pay upfront. If you’re paying for a service, make sure the work is being done to your satisfaction – before you pay. If it’s a product, get a receipt for payment.

Get all promises in writing. If you decide to do business with a door-to-door salesperson, make sure to get total price, all services, and approximate start and end time of any work. Get it written in a contract. If it’s some sort of subscription, and they promise there are no hidden fees, get it in writing.

Ask to see the terms and conditions. Legitimate businesses will give you the details in writing, including the commitment period, total price and cancellation instructions.

Request to see the seller’s license. Many municipalities require a solicitation license before you can sell door-to-door. If your town has this law, be sure to ask to see the seller’s license.

For more information you can trust, visit us at bbb.org or like us on Facebook.

Share Button

Spin-A-Thon Kickstarts Rodman Ride Campaign

YMCA_0489.JPG

By JOHN GALLUZZO

South Shore YMCA

Indoor cycling can be foundational to a good health and wellness regimen. It challenges not only the body, but the mind, but for all who come through the far end of a class, there is a minor sense of euphoria.

“It makes my day when members tell me, ‘That was so hard! I feel amazing,’” said Kendall Connerty, a spin instructor for the South Shore YMCA.

The benefits are obvious, posted in lists all over the internet: calorie burning, for sure; shapelier legs and abs if you stick with it; and a sense of community with other spinners who persevere with you. The benefits can be physical and they can be mental. Add an underlying cause, and indoor cycling is good for the soul.

Each year, the South Shore YMCA raises $2 million to give away to people in need on the South Shore. Four special events anchor this effort: Enchanted Evening, Taste of the South Shore, Golf Classic and the Rodman Ride for Kids. To kickstart the fundraising for Rodman Ride, the Y holds April Spin-a-Thons at the Quincy and Emilson (Hanover) branches.

Funds raised during the Spin-A-Thons and the Rodman Ride are dedicated to the Y’s Inclusion Program, a suite of offerings for people with differing abilities. These programs can range from social skills programs for kids to unified basketball and tennis teams to the Hopefish swim program for young people with autism. They’re designed to open doors for everybody, to foster a sense of openness and community for all who walk through the doors of the Y.

On Wednesday, April 13, spinners will gather at the Quincy Y for either the early (8 am to 1 pm) or late (4 to 8 pm) session. They will each carry a donation that will count toward the Y’s Rodman Ride for Kids total, pooling their support to help underwrite future Inclusion programs at the Y. And they will spin.

Indoor cycling as a national craze started out simply enough, in a California garage in 1980, championed by Rolling Stone magazine as the next big thing in fitness in 1993. Although it’s evolved over time, with better equipment and even instruction techniques, it still comes down to the basic elements of motivation, understanding personal limits, heart rate awareness and breathing control. The best spin classes include several important components. The instructor can make or break the experience, as the good ones draw more out of participants than they ever knew they could give. Lighting changes can make things lively, rave-like. And adrenaline-pumping music can mean the difference between reaching the goal and almost getting there. As an added bonus for the evening session, to keep those pedals turning, the Quincy Y will present a live DJ, JG of MeggaToned Records.

“I love teaching spin,” said Connerty. “It’s wonderful to be able to encourage people to push themselves to greater limits than they believe.” She knows, too, that there are many reasons why her followers join her in class each day. “Sometimes,” she said, “it’s as simple as being an escape from the hassles of the daily grind, or an athlete accomplishing a challenging workout. Whatever the reason, I look forward to being the motivating force for members to achieve their fitness goals.

Add to it all the knowledge that by participating in Spin-A-Thon, we contribute to the growth of our neighbors, and it all makes sense. It costs just $25 to join the fun of the 2016 Spin-A-Thon. For more information on how to participate, contact Kristen Noonan, the South Shore YMCA’s Senior Director of Group Exercise, at knoonan@ssymca.org or (781)829-8585 ext. 8300.

The South Shore YMCA is a charity. For information on how to support its work through volunteering or donations, contact Mary Orne at morne@ssymca.org or 781-264-9400 ext. 3306.

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month

As a leading organization in Youth Development, the South Shore YMCA is committed to educating our community on how to prevent, recognize, and react responsibly to child abuse. While the Y is committed to child safety year-round, each April we add a special emphasis on raising awareness in our communities in support of this national movement by offering a variety of opportunities to promote child well-being and enhance child safety, including events such as Healthy Kids Day on Saturday, April 30th from 11 am to 1 pm at the Y’s Quincy and Emilson Branches and child protection training opportunities for staff and community members. Visit www.ssymca.org/safe-kids to explore valuable child protection resources with some key information that we hope will help you understand this community challenge.

Save the Date for Healthy Kids Day
The South Shore YMCA’s Healthy Kids Day is a free community event to get kids moving and learning and families living healthier. Healthy Kids Day is the Y’s national initiative to improve the health and well-being of families and to help them get a jump on creating a healthier summer. This year, events at both the Quincy and Emilson Branches will feature fun, active play and educational activities that will inspire kids to carry a spirit of excitement and exploration throughout their summer.  Save the date! April 30, 11 am to 1 pm.

April Vacation Week Programming at the Y
Crazy Crafts! Use a variety of materials to get messy and create exciting craft projects. We will work with an array of materials and mediums, including paint, papier-mâché’, yarn, and more! Let your creative side run wild! For kids in grades 1 through 5, Tuesday, April 19 through Friday, April 22, 10 am to 12 pm. Cost: $80 Member; $120 Non-Member.

Share Button