Gasoline Prices Down Two Cents

Gasoline prices in Massachusetts are down two cents from last week, according to AAA Northeast.

AAA’s July 27th survey of prices in Massachusetts found self-serve, regular unleaded averaging $2.64 per gallon, down two cents from last week. Prices locally are 10 cents less than a month ago. The current price is seven cents less than the national average for self-serve unleaded of $2.71. A year ago at this time the Massachusetts average price was 94 cents higher at $3.58.

“The falling prices we’ve seen in recent weeks spell good news for vacationing motorists, who experienced the lowest July 4th prices we’d seen in 5 years, and can now benefit from mid-summer prices at the pump that continue to trend lower,” said Mary Maguire, Director of Public and Legislative Affairs for AAA Northeast.

The range in prices in the latest AAA survey for unleaded regular is 54 cents, from a low of $2.41 to a high of $2.95. AAA advises motorists to shop around for the best prices in their area, and to make sure they and their passengers buckle up — every trip, every time.

Today’s local gas prices and their ranges are as follows:

Self Serve                                                Grade

$2.649 ($2.419-$2.959)                                    Regular Unleaded

$2.879 ($2.689-$3.199)                                    Midgrade Unleaded

$3.049 ($2.799-$3.499)                                    Premium Unleaded

$2.899 ($2.749-$3.699)                                    Diesel

Find the most up-to-date local gas prices with the AAA Fuel Finder by logging onto AAA.com and clicking on Gas Saving Tips & Tools. AAA members can also obtain a copy of the Gas Watcher’s Guide at their local AAA Northeast office.

AAA Fuel Saving Tip of the Week

Accelerate smoothly and brake gradually. It’s safer, uses less gas, and reduces brake wear.

Share Button

Adams Green Project Construction Activities Week Of July 26

Adams Green Flyer 7-26-2015

Share Button

Unidentified Toddler Featured In PSA On Billboards

Massachusetts State Police and the Suffolk County District Attorney’s office are working with MassDOT to expand outreach to the public through digital billboards seeking assistance identifying the unknown toddler whose body was found on Deer Island last month.

11403108_847752245308760_5335715559566210306_n-361x500A total of 84 MassDOT-permitted billboards in 50 locations across Massachusetts (including the one pictured here, on I-95 in Canton) will feature dedicated tip lines that may be reached by phone or text message along with a computer-generated composite image created by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Tipsters are reminded not to text while driving.

Anyone with information on the girl’s identity may text the word GIRL followed by their tip to the number 67283. The text-a-tip line is completely anonymous and does not provide authorities with any information about the tipster. A phone line is also available at 617-396-5655. All tips will go directly to the Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit, which is investigating the little girl’s death.

A woman walking her dog along the western shore of Deer Island found the child’s body in a trash bag on the afternoon of June 25. The girl is believed to have been about 4-years-old, had brown eyes and brown hair, weighed about 30 pounds, and stood about 3½ feet tall. She was wearing a distinctive pair of white leggings with black-and-white polka dots and was found with a zebra-print fleece blanket that investigators believe may have been special to her.

In the days and weeks that followed, investigators have acted on hundreds of leads and coordinated dozens of well-being checks on children locally, nationally, and internationally. To date, however, none have led to the child’s identification.

Share Button

Memorial Service Marks 65th Anniversary Of Korean War

The 65th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War was remembered at a ceremony at the Korean War Memorial Thursday. The names of the 38 Quincy residents who were killed during the war were read during the service. Keynote speaker was Song Jun Ohm (left), Consul General Republic of South Korea. Pausing at the memorial during the playing of "Taps" after placing a wreath at the memorial are Ambassador Ohm, Mayor Thomas Koch and state Rep. Tackey Chan. More coverage in the July 1st issue of The Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

The 65th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War was remembered at a ceremony at the Korean War Memorial Thursday. The names of the 38 Quincy residents who were killed during the war were read during the service. Those names are engraved on the granite memorial located at the intersection of Hancock Street and Merrymount Parkway. Keynote speaker was Song Jun Ohm (left), Consul General Republic of South Korea. Pausing during the playing of “Taps” after placing a wreath at the memorial are Ambassador Ohm, Mayor Thomas Koch and state Rep. Tackey Chan. More coverage in the July 1st issue of The Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Share Button

Thousands Celebrate Flag Day At Parade, Fireworks

Youth baseball players were among the hundreds of local youngsters who waved flags marching in Saturday's 64th annual Quincy Flag Day Parade. Thousands lined the parade route from Quincy Center to Merrymount Parkway. A dazzling fireworks display capped off the celebration at Pageant Field. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworth

Youth baseball players were among the hundreds of local youngsters who waved American flags marching in Saturday’s 64th annual Quincy Flag Day Parade. Thousands lined the parade route from Quincy Center to Merrymount Parkway for the annual tradition. A dazzling fireworks display capped off the celebration at Pageant Field. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworth

Youngsters showed their Flag Day spirit dressed in patriotic attire as they watch the Quincy Flag Day Parade Saturday.

Youngsters and adults showed their Flag Day spirit dressed in patriotic attire as they watch the Quincy Flag Day Parade Saturday.

Mayor Thomas Koch, chairman of the Quincy Flag Day Parade, and his wife, Christine, greet spectators along the parade route.

Mayor Thomas Koch, chairman of the Quincy Flag Day Parade, and his wife, Christine, greet spectators along the parade route. The mayor’s father, the late Richard J. Koch, established the Quincy Flag Day parade in the 1950s.

Ed Keohane, chairman of the Keohane Funeral Home  and longtime civic activist, waves to onlookers from an open convertible during Saturday's Quincy Flag Day Parade. Keohane received the Richard J. Koch Youth Service Award following the parade.

Ed Keohane, chairman of the Keohane Funeral Home and longtime civic activist, waves to onlookers from an open convertible during Saturday’s Quincy Flag Day Parade. Keohane received the Richard J. Koch Youth Service Award following the parade.

Miss Massachusetts 2014 - Lauren Kuhn - wishes spectators a Happy Flag Day riding in a Mustang convertible.

Miss Massachusetts 2014 – Lauren Kuhn – wishes spectators a Happy Flag Day riding in a Mustang convertible.

Youngsters enjoy the view from atop a British tank, one of the attractions in this year's Quincy Flag Day Parade.

Youngsters enjoy the view from atop a British tank, one of the attractions in this year’s Quincy Flag Day Parade.

Following the parade, a large American flag was raised by two Quincy Fire Department ladder trucks. A spectacular fireworks display (photo below) capped off this year's Flag Day celebration at Pageant Field.

Following the parade, a large American flag was raised by two Quincy Fire Department ladder trucks. A spectacular fireworks display (photo below) capped off this year’s Flag Day celebration at Pageant Field.

fireworks 9750

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share Button