Quincy College Students Ranked First As Top Salary Earners For 2-Year Public Colleges

According to data from the U.S. Department of Education’s innovative tool, the College Scorecard, Quincy College students are ranked #1 as Top Salary Earners in Massachusetts and  New England across two-year public colleges.  The College Scorecard is a free resource that provides information for families and students to make educated decisions in the college search process.

The U.S. Department of Education’s data reviewed the outcomes of students across the nation, who received federal financial aid, and revealed that Quincy College students are top earners ahead of all 2-year public colleges in Massachusetts. This includes colleges within the Massachusetts state-supported public community college system. In addition to being ranked first in the Commonwealth, Quincy College students also ranked #1 in the region as Top Salary Earners in all of New England across two-year public colleges. Quincy College students rank #5 in Massachusetts and #9 in New England for top earners among all 2-year public and private colleges.

Quincy College, Massachusetts’ only municipally-affiliated public college, was additionally mentioned in the U.S. Department of Education’s October 30, 2015 blog post which listed by state the top two-year public colleges across the U.S. at which earnings exceed those of the typical two-year college.

“Besides traditional majors, Quincy College provides a rigorous and relevant post-secondary education to prepare students for careers in high growth allied health and STEM fields. In addition, through strong relationships with both students and industry partners, the College’s faculty serve as an important bridge to real jobs that pay family sustaining wages. The U.S. Department of Education’s College Scorecard reflects the high value of a Quincy College education not only for our current students and alumni but for future students as well,” said Aundrea Kelley, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at Quincy College.

The U.S. Department of Education’s College Scorecard is a new initiative by the White House to help students and their families make more educated decisions about college. Using the College Scorecard, students and their families can look up the cost and assess the value of colleges.  Each scorecard highlights five key pieces of data about a college: costs, graduation rate, loan default rate, average amount borrowed, and median earnings of former students who received federal financial aid, at 10 years after attending.

In as little as two years, students can learn more to eventually earn more. Quincy College programs are designed to provide students with specific skills and job training so they may enter the workforce or pursue advanced degrees. The U.S. Department of Education’s College Scorecard data reveals the successful outcomes of Quincy College students and reflects the high value of a Quincy College education beyond the classroom.

Quincy College’s programs, partnerships, and curriculum are addressing a critical skills gap for the Commonwealth and the New England region. Ongoing collaboration with the College’s multiple industry advisory boards keeps course offerings relevant to industry needs, establishes workforce pipelines, and helps students maximize their return on investment in their studies.

Quincy College President Peter H. Tsaffaras, J.D. reflected on the recent U.S. Department of Education’s ranking: “Our goal is to provide people with an education that allows them to become socially and economically productive members of society. This information, which was developed by the U.S Department of Education and is available to the public, indicates that we are making progress on behalf of our students in achieving our goal.”

Quincy College offers 35 associate degree programs and 21 certificate programs in a variety of disciplines, including those within Professional Programs, Liberal Arts, Natural & Health Sciences, and Nursing. For more information on Quincy College programs, please visit: www.quincycollege.edu.

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FY 2016 Valuations Available At Assessors Office, Library, Online

The Quincy Board of Assessors has conducted a comprehensive reassessment of all classes of properties in the City of Quincy, as mandated by the Massachusetts Department of Revenue.

The proposed Fiscal Year 2016 valuations are available for review in the Assessors Office, City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., Quincy, daily from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. They are also available at the Thomas Crane Public Library on Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The valuations are available online at http://www.quincyma.gov

These values are pending preliminary certification, according to city officials.

Taxpayers may contact the Board of Assessors with questions regarding the
proposed assessments by calling 617-376-1183.

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Nine New Quincy Firefighters Sworn In

Nine new Quincy firefighters were sworn in Wednesday morning at a ceremony held at the Kennedy Center. About 100 family, friends, city officials and fellow firefighters attended the ceremony. Here City Clerk Joseph Shea (far right) swears in four of the new firefighters. From the left: FF Christopher Stivalettta, FF Daniel Kennedy, FF Mark Gilbody, FF Thomas Callanan and Fire Chief Joseph Barron. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Nine new Quincy firefighters were sworn in Wednesday morning at a ceremony held at the Kennedy Center. About 100 family, friends, city officials and fellow firefighters attended the ceremony. Here City Clerk Joseph Shea (far right) swears in four of the new firefighters. From the left: FF Christopher Stivalettta, FF Daniel Kennedy, FF Mark Gilbody, FF Thomas Callanan and Fire Chief Joseph Barron. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Mayor Thomas Koch (far left) with the other four firefighters who were sworn in at a ceremony Wednesday morning at the Kennedy Center. Second from left: FF James Reilly, FF Joseph Morris, FF Gerard Shea and FF Joseph Keegan. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Mayor Thomas Koch (far left) with the other five firefighters who were sworn in at a ceremony Wednesday morning at the Kennedy Center. Second from left: FF James Reilly, FF Joseph Morris, FF Gerard Shea, FF Joseph Keegan and FF Anthony Walsh. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

New Quincy firefighters Joseph Morris (right) and James Reilly congratulate one another with a hand-shake after being sworn in at Wednesday's ceremony. At left is fellow new firefighter Gerard Shea. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

New Quincy firefighter Joseph Morris (right) receives congratulations with a handshake from a well-wisher after being sworn in as one of the city’s nine new firefighters. At left is fellow new firefighter Gerard Shea. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

 

 

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Crane, Workers Move 4,500-Pound City Hall Safe

Workers using a crane lifted and moved the 4,500-pound safe from the City Clerk's office in the Monroe Building to the clerk's new office at the glass annex building of City Hall, 1305 Hancock St. The new City Clerk's office will be open as of Monday, Aug. 24. Among those looking on during the Tuesday morning move is City Clerk Joseph Shea (left).

Workers using a crane lifted and moved the 4,500-pound safe from the City Clerk’s office at 1259 Hancock St. (first floor of the Monroe Building) to the clerk’s new office on the second floor of the glass annex building of City Hall, 1305 Hancock St. The new City Clerk’s office will be open as of Monday, Aug. 24. Among those looking on during the Tuesday morning move is City Clerk Joseph Shea (left).

Using a crane, workers lift and guide the 4,500-pound City Hall safe through a second story-window of the glass annex building of City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., Tuesday morning. The safe will be located in the new office of the City Clerk that is relocating from the first floor of the Monroe Building to the second floor of the glass annex City Hall building, 1305 Hancock St. The City Clerk's office will be open at its new location on Monday. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworth

Using a crane, workers lift and guide the 4,500-pound City Hall safe through a second story-window of the glass annex building of City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., Tuesday morning. The safe will be located in the new office of the City Clerk that is relocating from the first floor of the Monroe Building to the second floor of the glass annex building. The City Clerk’s office will be open at its new location on Monday. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworth

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Unidentified Toddler Featured In PSA On Billboards

Massachusetts State Police and the Suffolk County District Attorney’s office are working with MassDOT to expand outreach to the public through digital billboards seeking assistance identifying the unknown toddler whose body was found on Deer Island last month.

11403108_847752245308760_5335715559566210306_n-361x500A total of 84 MassDOT-permitted billboards in 50 locations across Massachusetts (including the one pictured here, on I-95 in Canton) will feature dedicated tip lines that may be reached by phone or text message along with a computer-generated composite image created by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Tipsters are reminded not to text while driving.

Anyone with information on the girl’s identity may text the word GIRL followed by their tip to the number 67283. The text-a-tip line is completely anonymous and does not provide authorities with any information about the tipster. A phone line is also available at 617-396-5655. All tips will go directly to the Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit, which is investigating the little girl’s death.

A woman walking her dog along the western shore of Deer Island found the child’s body in a trash bag on the afternoon of June 25. The girl is believed to have been about 4-years-old, had brown eyes and brown hair, weighed about 30 pounds, and stood about 3½ feet tall. She was wearing a distinctive pair of white leggings with black-and-white polka dots and was found with a zebra-print fleece blanket that investigators believe may have been special to her.

In the days and weeks that followed, investigators have acted on hundreds of leads and coordinated dozens of well-being checks on children locally, nationally, and internationally. To date, however, none have led to the child’s identification.

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