Jack Cadegan Named Quincy Fire Chief

Jack Cadegan, a 33-year veteran of the Quincy Fire Department, was sworn in as the department's new chief at a ceremony Monday in the Great Hall of the James R. McIntyre Government Center (old City Hall). Here Chief Cadegan shakes hands with City Clerk Nicole Crispo after he was sworn in. At right is Mayor Thiomas Koch who appointed Cadegan the new chief succeeding Joseph Barron who retired earlier this year. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Jack Cadegan, a 33-year veteran of the Quincy Fire Department, was sworn in as the department’s new chief at a ceremony Monday in the Great Hall of the James R. McIntyre Government Center (old City Hall). Here Chief Cadegan shakes hands with City Clerk Nicole Crispo after he was sworn in. At right is Mayor Thomas Koch who appointed Cadegan the new chief succeeding Joseph Barron who retired earlier this year. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

By SCOTT JACKSON

A standing-room-only crowd of more than 100 firefighters was on hand Monday morning inside City Hall to watch Jack Cadegan be sworn in as Quincy’s new fire chief.

Cadegan, 63, has served with the Quincy Fire Department for 33 years including four years as a deputy chief. Cadegan replaces Joseph Barron, who served 10 years as chief prior to his retirement this July.

Quincy Fire Chief Jack Cadegan

Quincy Fire Chief Jack Cadegan

City Clerk Nicole Crispo swore-in the new chief during the ceremony, and Cadegan’s wife, Karen, pinned him with his new badge.

Mayor Thomas Koch said Cadegan has the right temperament to lead the department, which has an annual budget of $25 million and whose ranks include more than 200 firefighters, officers and civilian employees.

“I know the job of being a manager, being the chief, being the leader of the department is not an easy one. You try to balance all of the issues at hand, all the needs, all the requests, and I think Jack Cadegan has that ability,” Koch said. “He’s got the right temperament. He is a quiet leader but a very effective leader, and he obviously has the respect of the men in the department.”

Quincy Fire Chief Jack Cadegan and his wife, Karen, share a moment aet the chief's swearing in ceremony Monday. Karen pinned the chief's badge on her husband after he was sworn in by City Clerk Nicole Crispo. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Quincy Fire Chief Jack Cadegan and his wife, Karen, share a moment at the chief’s swearing in ceremony Monday. Karen pinned the chief’s badge on her husband after he was sworn in by City Clerk Nicole Crispo. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Mayor Thomas Koch (right) congratulates new Quincy Fire Chief Jack Cadegan after he was sworn in Monday at the Great Hall of the James R. McIntyre Government Center. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Mayor Thomas Koch (right) congratulates new Quincy Fire Chief Jack Cadegan after he was sworn in Monday at a ceremony in the Great Hall of the James R. McIntyre Government Center. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Three deputy chiefs were among the Quincy firefighters who attended the swearing in ceremony for new Chief Jack  Cadegan. From left: Deputy Chief Joe Jackson, Chief Cadegan, Deputy Chief Ed Fenby and Deputy Chief Paul Griffith. More coverage in the Dec. 20th issue of The Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Three deputy chiefs were among the more than 100 Quincy firefighters who attended the swearing in ceremony for new Chief Jack Cadegan. From left: Deputy Chief Joe Jackson, Chief Cadegan, Deputy Chief Ed Fenby and Deputy Chief Paul Griffith. More coverage in the Dec. 20th issue of The Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

 

 

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Eastern Nazarene College Names New President

By SCOTT JACKSON

Eastern Nazarene College’s Board of Trustees has tabbed an administrator from a Christian liberal arts school in New York as the next president of the Quincy-based college.

Connell

Connell

The Rev. Dr. Jack Connell, currently the provost and dean of the faculty at Houghton College in Houghton, N.Y., has been named the 14th president of ENC. Dr. Russell Long, chairman of ENC’s Board of Trustees, announced the hiring of Connell on Monday.

“We have made prayer a priority during the search for our next president, and frequently we have been reminded that God has been working behind the scenes,” Long said in a statement. “While we were searching, God was preparing Dr. Connell for this assignment. A former president of Roberts Wesleyan made the comment that he believed God had saved Jack for this assignment. We feel that confirmation as well in that he is uniquely prepared for the multiple challenges we face.”

Long said the selection of Connell followed an exhaustive, national search led by a committee of trustees, faculty and staff from the college that featured a talented and competitive pool of candidates. Long said Connell’s career in both higher education and ministry, and his vision for ENC’s future, resonated with the search committee.

Connell will begin his tenure at ENC immediately as president elect and transition more fully into his role in the coming months as he transfers his current duties to new leadership at Houghton College. He currently resides in Houghton, N.Y., with his wife, Wendy. They have four adult children: David, Rebekah, Jonathan and Michael.

“My heart has been captured by the mission of ENC, and I am deeply honored to be selected by the Board of Trustees as ENC’s next president,” Connell said. I believe there are amazing opportunities in front of us, and I look forward to engaging with the entire community as we move boldly and hopefully into a bright future.

“Wendy and I look forward to moving to the Quincy area next summer and ask for your prayers in this time of transition for us all.”

ENC, a Christian liberal arts college, was founded 118 years ago in Saratoga Springs, N.Y, and moved to Quincy in 1919. The school has an enrollment of more than 1,000 students and offers 41 majors.

The school’s trustees, Long said, believe ENC will be well positioned for future growth as it celebrates 100 years of academic excellence and a rich legacy of leadership and service at its current Quincy campus under Connell’s leadership,

Connell had served as the provost and dean of the faculty at Houghton College since 2016. Leading over 100 faculty and staff members, Connell he served as the chief academic officer and chief enrollment officer on the president’s leadership team. He was instrumental in the development of new academic programs, the growth of Houghton Online, and the launch of new extension site programs, Long said.

From 2008 to 2016, Connell spearheaded major initiatives in enrollment, advancement, and strategic planning at Roberts Wesleyan College & Northeastern Seminary in Rochester, N.Y., as an executive vice president. Among his many accomplishments there, Long said, Connell led the largest comprehensive fundraising campaign in the college’s history, a campaign that raised more than $40 million dollars for scholarships, endowment, and capital projects.

Connell served as a senior pastor of the Crosswinds Wesleyan Church in Canandaigua, N.Y., from 1995 to 2006 and the Lyncourt Wesleyan Church in Syracuse, N.Y., from 1989 to 1994. Under his spiritual guidance, the Crosswinds congregation became one of the largest churches in the denomination with average weekend attendance growing from 200 to 1400,” Long said.

Connell holds a Doctor of Education in higher education leadership from the University of Rochester Warner School of Education; a Doctor of Ministry in leadership and Biblical preaching and a Master of Divinity from the Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Ky.; and a Bachelor of Science in business administration from Houghton College.

He also served on numerous boards, Long said, including 13 years on the Houghton College Board of Trustees.

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Residents, Councillors Critical Of Quincy Hospital Site Plan

FoxRock Properties has proposed constructing 598 apartments on the site of the former Quincy Medical Center. All buildings currently on site, except for the administration building seen at center, would be demolished. Rendering courtesy FoxRock Properties.

FoxRock Properties has proposed constructing 598 apartments on the site of the former Quincy Medical Center. All buildings currently on site, except for the administration building seen at center, would be demolished. Rendering courtesy FoxRock Properties.

By SCOTT JACKSON

More than a dozen area residents, the local neighborhood association and five city councillors voiced their concerns over a developer’s proposal to build nearly 600 residential units on the site of Quincy Medical Center.

The project, they said, would be too dense for the Hospital Hill neighborhood with apartment buildings placed too close to abutting homes.

The Planning Board on Wednesday held its first meeting on FoxRock Properties’ plan to place 598 apartments and 5,000 square feet of retail space on the 14.4-acre hospital site at 144 Whitwell St. The project also includes 802 parking spaces, nearly all of them in garages beneath the residential buildings. The board spent more than two and a half hours listening to the applicant and then members of the public, and will hold a second public hearing on the matter at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 5.

FoxRock has proposed tearing down every building on the hospital site, except for the administration building in front, which would be renovated for retail use. They are proposing to build 36 row houses, 17 townhouses and four six-story apartment buildings on the property.

FoxRock’s Jason Ward said his team welcomed feedback from the public and would strive to address the concerns that were raised.

“We believe that the submission of our plan was the initiation of both the public process and public dialogue. We welcome this part of the process very sincerely. We’ve spent the last 10 months working with some of the best consultants, engineers, designers in the world, and we are delighted for the plan that is being presented,” Ward said at the start of the presentation.

“We love Hospital Hill. We’re going to make sincere efforts to address specific concerns expressed tonight by our neighbors and especially by our direct abutters.”

Michael LeBlanc, a principal with the design firm Utile, said the plan for the site revolves around three principles: acknowledging the site’s history and keeping the administration building front and center; creating a network of open spaces, including a green space and terrace area in front of the administration building and another green space at the center of the site; and prioritizing pedestrians over vehicles, which includes tree-lined streets.

Residents and city councillors who attended the meeting voiced their concerns about the project.

Ward 5 Councillor Kirsten Hughes, whose district includes the former hospital, said the four six-story buildings included as part of the proposal do not jell with the surrounding neighborhood.

“There are some really disappointing aspects, particularly the…larger scale buildings, which don’t fit in with the character of that neighborhood, at all,” Hughes said.

“I know [FoxRock] wants to develop the site to its fullest, but we also want to ensure that that site brings our neighborhood to its fullest potential, and this presentation doesn’t get us there.”

Ward 3 Councillor Ian Cain, whose district includes the opposite side of Whitwell Street, said the plan was too dense and too close to abutting homes.

“Though I look forward to the improvements on the current Quincy Hospital site, the current scale of the proposed project is far too dense for the encapsulating neighborhood and I would hope for the developers to revisit the setbacks as planned so as not to dramatically infringe on the direct abutters,” Cain said in a letter to the board.

“I have no doubt the FoxRock team will do the right thing, properly listen to the area residents…and come to a resolution that makes sense for all parties.”

The city’s three at-large councillors – Noel DiBona, Nina Liang and Mahoney – all raised concerns about the project as well.

DiBona said the project would negatively impact the city’s school system and police and fire services by adding upwards of 2,000 new residents. The city needs senior housing, he added, and the developer should build senior housing on site or cut the number of units in half.

“Why go to Florida when you can sell your house in the city of Quincy and go up the Hospital Hill over 55 community?” DiBona said. “That’s what I’m proposing as an alternate route – or cut the units in half, 598 units to 299.”

Liang said the project requires real collaboration between the developer and neighborhood.

“We can all agree this is a blighted property and we want something to be done here, but not done with collaboration – real collaboration – with the neighbors,” she said.

Mahoney likewise said dialogue between the neighborhood and developer was key to the project.

“I want so badly for [FoxRock] to come to this table and work with the neighborhood, because good development can happen here, but it can’t happen if it’s a one-side conversation,” she said.

Representatives from Hospital Hill Neighborhoods Association had a chance to make their own presentation during the public hearing.

Will Smith of the HHNA said the group, which represents about 100 families in the area, would like to see the overall density of the project decrease and the setbacks between the new buildings and abutting properties increased. FoxRock, Smith added, has worked with neighbors on plans for Glendale Park but not the development itself.

“We agree that this underutilized site and obsolete hospital must be redeveloped and we welcome the new residents it will bring to our neighborhood; however, the legitimate concerns of our neighbors cannot be ignored,” he said.

Jocelyn Sedney, another member of the HHNA, provided the Symmes Hospital site in Arlington as a similar example of a hospital being redeveloped. The project there includes 176 apartments and condominiums and 90 units of assisted living on a 16-acre site, she said.

“I’m not saying this is what FoxRock should do, I’m just suggesting that there are other options out there that could be beneficial to the neighborhood and beneficial to the developer as well,” Sedney said.

More than a dozen other residents voiced their objections to the project at the hearing or in letters to the board. None spoke in favor of the plans as presented.

Carolyn Long, a resident of Colonial Drive, which is located behind the hospital campus, said FoxRock’s proposal would create a city within a city that would be detrimental to the existing neighborhood.

“I believe that 114 Whitwell St. should be the jewel and the crown of the neighborhood. Instead, as it currently stands, it is a city within a city providing no real enhancement to the area other than generic places to rent. It will impact the peace, privacy and enjoyment of existing residents and abutters, and quite possibly lower property values,” Long said.

“I ask FoxRock to regard these comments not as obstructionist or as an opponent, but as a resident who loves where they live and wishes to work together to make this project the best it possibly could be.”

Ernest Gervino, who also lives on Colonial Drive, said the new buildings would loom large over the neighborhood.

“This proposal would clearly change the character of this hill by building fortress-type buildings. They would be 25 feet from my house,” he said. “It is almost as if it is a castle and we are the peasants on the outside.”

FoxRock acquired the hospital for $12 million from Steward Health Care, QMC’s former owner, in December 2016. As part of the deal to purchase the hospital, FoxRock, which is owned by Granite Telecommunications CEO and president Rob Hale, was also named the developer for the Ross Lot area in Quincy Center by Mayor Thomas Koch. Koch has said the company could build up to 1 million square feet of commercial space on that site.

The site at 114 Whitwell St. is in a planned-urban-development zoning district, which would have given the City Council, not the Planning Board, the ability to review the project. Councillors, however, amended the city’s zoning ordinance late last year to make redevelopment of a hospital site an allowed use in a PUD district subject to site-plan review by the Planning Board.

The council at that time also lowered the height of new buildings allowed on site from eight stories down to six and reduced the floor area ratio – which determines how dense new construction can be – from 4.0 to 2.5. The zoning change also required 20 percent of the site be kept as open space.

The 598-unit development would be served by entryways on both sides of the administration building that currently sits at the front of the property. The project also includes 5,000 square feet of retail. Renderings courtesy FoxRock Properties. 

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New Recycling Guidelines Announced

RecycleReferenceSheet_FINAL

The Massachusetts Dept. of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) has announced a statewide recycling education initiative to reduce contamination in recycling by asking residents to “do their part and recycle smart”.

Fifty percent of America’s recycling once was transported to China.  In recent months, China has raised its quality standards to a highly selective system resulting in millions of tons of recycling sitting unsold around the world.  Unfortunately, the burden of this change has come back to communities in the form of processing charges and contamination fees.

Recycling is a process of converting waste materials into reusable objects to prevent waste of potentially useful materials and reducing the consumption of energy usage and pollution.  Citizens can help fight the rising cost of recycling by carefully adhering to the guidelines in place currently.

“The situation is still in flux as waste management assesses the world standards,” said Mayor Thomas Koch.  “This latest information is a helpful reference for all of us in the community.”

Four categories of materials are identified that every materials recovery facility (MRF) across the state accepts.  They include mixed paper and cardboard, metal food and beverage cans, glass bottles and jars, plastic bottles, jars, jugs and tubs.

The top five contaminants that MRFs do not want in recycling loads include bagged recyclables and bagged garbage, loose plastic bags/plastic wrap, food and liquids, clothing or linens, “tanglers” like hoses, wires, chains, strings of lights, etc.

Recyclables should not be bagged in plastic.  They should be placed directly in recycling bins.  All recycling items must be cleaned of all food and liquids and all caps must be replaced before recycled.

For a full list of recycling guidelines, visit RecycleSmartMA.org. that features the “Smart Recycling Guide.”

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John Steele Promoted To Police Captain

JOHN STEELE (center) was promoted to the rank of police captain at a City Hall ceremony. Pictured with him are (from left) Mayor Thomas Koch, son John, wife Jessica, and Police Chief Paul Keenan. Quincy Sun Photo/Scott Jackson

JOHN STEELE (center) was promoted to the rank of police captain at a City Hall ceremony. Pictured with him are (from left) Mayor Thomas Koch, son John, wife Jessica, and Police Chief Paul Keenan. Quincy Sun Photo/Scott Jackson

By SCOTT JACKSON

John Steele, a 25-year veteran of the Quincy Police Department, was promoted to the rank of captain during a City Hall ceremony.

City Clerk Nicole Crispo swore in Steele, age 50, in front of a room full of fellow police officers Thursday morning. Steele’s wife, Jessica, pinned the captain with his new badge.

Following the promotion ceremony, Steele thanked department leadership and his fellow officers for their support, and said he would put his best foot forward.

“It’s something you work very hard for during your career,” Steele said of becoming captain. “It’s a huge step forward for my family. I promise I will put my best foot forward.”

Steele joined the department in 1993 and become one of its first community police officers, assigned to the Germantown area. He spent two years as a community police officer, and then five as a patrol officer across the city.

Steele was assigned to the Community Services Unit, now known as the Special Investigations Unit, as a detective from 2000 to 2002. While there, he investigated sex crimes and juvenile offenses.

Steele was promoted sergeant in 2002 and was assigned to patrol. He stayed there until 2005, when he was promoted to lieutenant. As lieutenant, he served as day patrol shift commander from 2005 to 2008, when he was reassigned to the Bureau of Criminal Investigations. Steele remained there until his promotion to captain.

Mayor Thomas Koch said Steele is well liked and respected within the department.

“I know Lieutenant Steele, about to be Captain Steele, has been a big part of the department for a long time and he’s well respected and well liked,” the mayor said. “We’re certainly proud of him and his family quite proud of him. It’s a good day for him certainly and a good day for the department. I congratulate you and your family and certainly wish you all the best.”

Koch also credited the police department for the work it does throughout the city. After the recent dedication of the Hancock-Adams Common, the mayor said the owner of a long-time business in Quincy Center remarked that he has never had to pull down a steel grate over his storefront at closing time, unlike businesses in other cities.

“He largely attributes that to the great department we have – you folks – and I absolutely agree with that,” Koch said. “You guys put it on the line every day and we’re a better community for that.”

Police Chief Paul Keenan said Steele is an outstanding police officer.

“John has been a good friend of mine for a lot of years. We’ve worked together in a number of different roles. He’s always been outstanding. I’ve always respected his judgment, without question, unless it comes to fantasy football,” Keenan said.

“John has been great leader in the Quincy Police Department and I really look forward to having him join the upper command staff and be part of the day-to-day operation.”

Keenan, age 60, said he has no plans to retire soon, but the department would be in good hands when he does because of Steele and officers throughout the ranks.

“When I do decide to retire…whenever that may be, I know I’m going to hand off the reins to a number of different men and women in this audience and the Quincy Police Department is going to be in great hands under the leadership of John and a number of the lieutenants, captains and sergeants who do a great job every day,” Keenan said.

Steele was promoted to captain because of the upcoming retirement of Capt. Anthony DiBona at the end of September, Keenan said. DiBona is retiring because he will reach the mandatory retirement age of 65.

The police chief said he is in the process of reviewing the assignments for his five captains with DiBona retiring, and would determine Steele’s assignment as part of the process.

Sgt. James Flaherty will be promoted to the rank of the lieutenant in the near future, Keenan said; Flaherty will receive the promotion while he is on active-duty military leave and will be formally sworn in once he returns.

James Greene was promoted to sergeant this March to fill Flaherty’s sergeant position, Keenan said.

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