Crane, Workers Move 4,500-Pound City Hall Safe

Workers using a crane lifted and moved the 4,500-pound safe from the City Clerk's office in the Monroe Building to the clerk's new office at the glass annex building of City Hall, 1305 Hancock St. The new City Clerk's office will be open as of Monday, Aug. 24. Among those looking on during the Tuesday morning move is City Clerk Joseph Shea (left).

Workers using a crane lifted and moved the 4,500-pound safe from the City Clerk’s office at 1259 Hancock St. (first floor of the Monroe Building) to the clerk’s new office on the second floor of the glass annex building of City Hall, 1305 Hancock St. The new City Clerk’s office will be open as of Monday, Aug. 24. Among those looking on during the Tuesday morning move is City Clerk Joseph Shea (left).

Using a crane, workers lift and guide the 4,500-pound City Hall safe through a second story-window of the glass annex building of City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., Tuesday morning. The safe will be located in the new office of the City Clerk that is relocating from the first floor of the Monroe Building to the second floor of the glass annex City Hall building, 1305 Hancock St. The City Clerk's office will be open at its new location on Monday. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworth

Using a crane, workers lift and guide the 4,500-pound City Hall safe through a second story-window of the glass annex building of City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., Tuesday morning. The safe will be located in the new office of the City Clerk that is relocating from the first floor of the Monroe Building to the second floor of the glass annex building. The City Clerk’s office will be open at its new location on Monday. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworth

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Unidentified Toddler Featured In PSA On Billboards

Massachusetts State Police and the Suffolk County District Attorney’s office are working with MassDOT to expand outreach to the public through digital billboards seeking assistance identifying the unknown toddler whose body was found on Deer Island last month.

11403108_847752245308760_5335715559566210306_n-361x500A total of 84 MassDOT-permitted billboards in 50 locations across Massachusetts (including the one pictured here, on I-95 in Canton) will feature dedicated tip lines that may be reached by phone or text message along with a computer-generated composite image created by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Tipsters are reminded not to text while driving.

Anyone with information on the girl’s identity may text the word GIRL followed by their tip to the number 67283. The text-a-tip line is completely anonymous and does not provide authorities with any information about the tipster. A phone line is also available at 617-396-5655. All tips will go directly to the Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit, which is investigating the little girl’s death.

A woman walking her dog along the western shore of Deer Island found the child’s body in a trash bag on the afternoon of June 25. The girl is believed to have been about 4-years-old, had brown eyes and brown hair, weighed about 30 pounds, and stood about 3½ feet tall. She was wearing a distinctive pair of white leggings with black-and-white polka dots and was found with a zebra-print fleece blanket that investigators believe may have been special to her.

In the days and weeks that followed, investigators have acted on hundreds of leads and coordinated dozens of well-being checks on children locally, nationally, and internationally. To date, however, none have led to the child’s identification.

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Memorial Service Marks 65th Anniversary Of Korean War

The 65th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War was remembered at a ceremony at the Korean War Memorial Thursday. The names of the 38 Quincy residents who were killed during the war were read during the service. Keynote speaker was Song Jun Ohm (left), Consul General Republic of South Korea. Pausing at the memorial during the playing of "Taps" after placing a wreath at the memorial are Ambassador Ohm, Mayor Thomas Koch and state Rep. Tackey Chan. More coverage in the July 1st issue of The Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

The 65th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War was remembered at a ceremony at the Korean War Memorial Thursday. The names of the 38 Quincy residents who were killed during the war were read during the service. Those names are engraved on the granite memorial located at the intersection of Hancock Street and Merrymount Parkway. Keynote speaker was Song Jun Ohm (left), Consul General Republic of South Korea. Pausing during the playing of “Taps” after placing a wreath at the memorial are Ambassador Ohm, Mayor Thomas Koch and state Rep. Tackey Chan. More coverage in the July 1st issue of The Quincy Sun. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

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Thousands Celebrate Flag Day At Parade, Fireworks

Youth baseball players were among the hundreds of local youngsters who waved flags marching in Saturday's 64th annual Quincy Flag Day Parade. Thousands lined the parade route from Quincy Center to Merrymount Parkway. A dazzling fireworks display capped off the celebration at Pageant Field. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworth

Youth baseball players were among the hundreds of local youngsters who waved American flags marching in Saturday’s 64th annual Quincy Flag Day Parade. Thousands lined the parade route from Quincy Center to Merrymount Parkway for the annual tradition. A dazzling fireworks display capped off the celebration at Pageant Field. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworth

Youngsters showed their Flag Day spirit dressed in patriotic attire as they watch the Quincy Flag Day Parade Saturday.

Youngsters and adults showed their Flag Day spirit dressed in patriotic attire as they watch the Quincy Flag Day Parade Saturday.

Mayor Thomas Koch, chairman of the Quincy Flag Day Parade, and his wife, Christine, greet spectators along the parade route.

Mayor Thomas Koch, chairman of the Quincy Flag Day Parade, and his wife, Christine, greet spectators along the parade route. The mayor’s father, the late Richard J. Koch, established the Quincy Flag Day parade in the 1950s.

Ed Keohane, chairman of the Keohane Funeral Home  and longtime civic activist, waves to onlookers from an open convertible during Saturday's Quincy Flag Day Parade. Keohane received the Richard J. Koch Youth Service Award following the parade.

Ed Keohane, chairman of the Keohane Funeral Home and longtime civic activist, waves to onlookers from an open convertible during Saturday’s Quincy Flag Day Parade. Keohane received the Richard J. Koch Youth Service Award following the parade.

Miss Massachusetts 2014 - Lauren Kuhn - wishes spectators a Happy Flag Day riding in a Mustang convertible.

Miss Massachusetts 2014 – Lauren Kuhn – wishes spectators a Happy Flag Day riding in a Mustang convertible.

Youngsters enjoy the view from atop a British tank, one of the attractions in this year's Quincy Flag Day Parade.

Youngsters enjoy the view from atop a British tank, one of the attractions in this year’s Quincy Flag Day Parade.

Following the parade, a large American flag was raised by two Quincy Fire Department ladder trucks. A spectacular fireworks display (photo below) capped off this year's Flag Day celebration at Pageant Field.

Following the parade, a large American flag was raised by two Quincy Fire Department ladder trucks. A spectacular fireworks display (photo below) capped off this year’s Flag Day celebration at Pageant Field.

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Hancock Cemetery Recommended For $500,000 In Conservation Funds

Hancock Cemetery Restoration – (from left to right) architect Jim Edwards; building and monument conservator Ivan Myjer; the City’s selected gravestone conservator for Phase 1 of the cemetery restoration, Ta Mara Conde; and Paul Holtz of the Massachusetts Historical Commission, on the final walk through of the cemetery following completion of Phase 1.

Hancock Cemetery Restoration – (from left to right) architect Jim Edwards; building and monument conservator Ivan Myjer; the City’s selected gravestone conservator for Phase 1 of the cemetery restoration, Ta Mara Conde; and Paul Holtz of the Massachusetts Historical Commission, on the final walk through of the cemetery following completion of Phase 1.

The Hancock Cemetery, which began a complete restoration last year, recently received grant funding to complete the scope of work recommended in its 2012 Master Conservation Plan.

The work to be completed in this next phase of the conservation includes restoration of the historic iron fence along Hancock Street, replacing the chain link fence with a historically appropriate iron picket and granite pier fence, pruning selected trees that currently endanger burial sites, and replacing the asphalt pathways with concrete.

Money for this second phase of the project comes from a $190,000 grant award from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and a recommendation for $310,000 from Quincy Community Preservation Act (CPA) funds. (The CPA funding recommendation is reviewed by the Mayor for inclusion in the City budget for fiscal year 2016. The City budget is assessed by the City Council in June, after which point the CPA grants and their dollar values can be confirmed.)

The first phase of the cemetery restoration was completed in August 2014. It consisted of treatment and resetting of more than 260 grave markers. For more information on the Hancock Cemetery conservation and restoration project contact Kara Chisholm, Assistant Planner, kchisholm@quincyma.gov or 617-376-1050, or see the Planning Department’s YouTube channel, Quincy PCD.

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