Thousands Celebrate Flag Day At Parade, Fireworks

Youth baseball players were among the hundreds of local youngsters who waved flags marching in Saturday's 64th annual Quincy Flag Day Parade. Thousands lined the parade route from Quincy Center to Merrymount Parkway. A dazzling fireworks display capped off the celebration at Pageant Field. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworth

Youth baseball players were among the hundreds of local youngsters who waved American flags marching in Saturday’s 64th annual Quincy Flag Day Parade. Thousands lined the parade route from Quincy Center to Merrymount Parkway for the annual tradition. A dazzling fireworks display capped off the celebration at Pageant Field. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworth

Youngsters showed their Flag Day spirit dressed in patriotic attire as they watch the Quincy Flag Day Parade Saturday.

Youngsters and adults showed their Flag Day spirit dressed in patriotic attire as they watch the Quincy Flag Day Parade Saturday.

Mayor Thomas Koch, chairman of the Quincy Flag Day Parade, and his wife, Christine, greet spectators along the parade route.

Mayor Thomas Koch, chairman of the Quincy Flag Day Parade, and his wife, Christine, greet spectators along the parade route. The mayor’s father, the late Richard J. Koch, established the Quincy Flag Day parade in the 1950s.

Ed Keohane, chairman of the Keohane Funeral Home  and longtime civic activist, waves to onlookers from an open convertible during Saturday's Quincy Flag Day Parade. Keohane received the Richard J. Koch Youth Service Award following the parade.

Ed Keohane, chairman of the Keohane Funeral Home and longtime civic activist, waves to onlookers from an open convertible during Saturday’s Quincy Flag Day Parade. Keohane received the Richard J. Koch Youth Service Award following the parade.

Miss Massachusetts 2014 - Lauren Kuhn - wishes spectators a Happy Flag Day riding in a Mustang convertible.

Miss Massachusetts 2014 – Lauren Kuhn – wishes spectators a Happy Flag Day riding in a Mustang convertible.

Youngsters enjoy the view from atop a British tank, one of the attractions in this year's Quincy Flag Day Parade.

Youngsters enjoy the view from atop a British tank, one of the attractions in this year’s Quincy Flag Day Parade.

Following the parade, a large American flag was raised by two Quincy Fire Department ladder trucks. A spectacular fireworks display (photo below) capped off this year's Flag Day celebration at Pageant Field.

Following the parade, a large American flag was raised by two Quincy Fire Department ladder trucks. A spectacular fireworks display (photo below) capped off this year’s Flag Day celebration at Pageant Field.

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Hancock Cemetery Recommended For $500,000 In Conservation Funds

Hancock Cemetery Restoration – (from left to right) architect Jim Edwards; building and monument conservator Ivan Myjer; the City’s selected gravestone conservator for Phase 1 of the cemetery restoration, Ta Mara Conde; and Paul Holtz of the Massachusetts Historical Commission, on the final walk through of the cemetery following completion of Phase 1.

Hancock Cemetery Restoration – (from left to right) architect Jim Edwards; building and monument conservator Ivan Myjer; the City’s selected gravestone conservator for Phase 1 of the cemetery restoration, Ta Mara Conde; and Paul Holtz of the Massachusetts Historical Commission, on the final walk through of the cemetery following completion of Phase 1.

The Hancock Cemetery, which began a complete restoration last year, recently received grant funding to complete the scope of work recommended in its 2012 Master Conservation Plan.

The work to be completed in this next phase of the conservation includes restoration of the historic iron fence along Hancock Street, replacing the chain link fence with a historically appropriate iron picket and granite pier fence, pruning selected trees that currently endanger burial sites, and replacing the asphalt pathways with concrete.

Money for this second phase of the project comes from a $190,000 grant award from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and a recommendation for $310,000 from Quincy Community Preservation Act (CPA) funds. (The CPA funding recommendation is reviewed by the Mayor for inclusion in the City budget for fiscal year 2016. The City budget is assessed by the City Council in June, after which point the CPA grants and their dollar values can be confirmed.)

The first phase of the cemetery restoration was completed in August 2014. It consisted of treatment and resetting of more than 260 grave markers. For more information on the Hancock Cemetery conservation and restoration project contact Kara Chisholm, Assistant Planner, kchisholm@quincyma.gov or 617-376-1050, or see the Planning Department’s YouTube channel, Quincy PCD.

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Mayor, Developers Unveil Three Major Downtown Developments

Quincy developer Peter O’Connell, who has developed landmark local projects such as Marina Bay and Quarry Hills, has proposed to build a 122-unit, 15-story luxury high rise in the Hancock Parking Lot. Rendering courtesy Ross Design Construction/John R. Perry Architects

Quincy developer Peter O’Connell, who has developed landmark local projects such as Marina Bay and Quarry Hills, has proposed to build a 122-unit, 15-story luxury high rise in the Hancock Parking Lot. Rendering courtesy Ross Design Construction/John R. Perry Architects

Three developers (from left) Alex Matov, Peter O'Connell and Sean Galvin joined Mayor Thomas Koch Tuesday in unveiling plans for three major developments in Quincy Center. The trio projects that have a combined dollar figure of $100 call for a 15-story residential tower, a hotel, and a luxury condominium building. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Three developers (from left) Alex Matov, Peter O’Connell and Sean Galvin joined Mayor Thomas Koch Tuesday in unveiling plans for three major developments in Quincy Center. The trio of projects that have a combined dollar figure of $100 million in private investment call for a 15-story residential tower, a hotel, and a luxury condominium building. Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Bosworth

Mayor Thomas Koch joined with three developers Tuesday to unveil  a proposed 15-story residential tower, a hotel, and a luxury condominium building that proponents said would anchor the next step of Quincy Center redevelopment.

Developers Peter O’Connell of Quincy, Alex Matov of LBC Boston and Quincy native Sean Galvin of Galvcon Development detailed their mixed-use projects at a news conference today in the Mayor’s office. Combined, the projects will total in the range of $100 million in private investment.

“This is a tremendously important step forward for the future of Quincy Center,” said Mayor Koch “We have been working for some time on creating the opportunity to bring this kind of private investment to the heart of Quincy Center, and it’s going to happen. The time is now, and I’m thrilled that these developers have shown such great commitment to our future.”

  • O’Connell, who has developed landmark local projects such as Marina Bay and Quarry Hills, will build a 122-unit, 15-story luxury high rise in the Hancock Parking Lot;
  • LBC Boston, which has spent more than $23 million acquiring property around Quincy Center over the last year, will build a 116-room hotel at 1500 Hancock Street, the block beginning at the corner of Cottage Avenue.
  • Galvcon Development, a long-time Quincy developer of high-end residential properties, will build 48 luxury condominium units on the site once home to Woolworth’s at the intersection of Hancock Street and Cliveden Street.

The Mayor also announced that this phase of development will include the construction of a parking garage in the Hancock Lot. The design and total number of spaces is being engineered now. Based on the design of the garage, remaining property in the Hancock Lot will be offered to additional developers in the form of a Request For Proposals.

He said the City’s overall strategy for the downtown has remained unchanged, asserting that any infrastructure investment will be directly tied to new revenue generated by the private development.

“We’ve said from Day One, we’ve held to it, and we’re going to continue to hold to it – the downtown will pay for itself,” he said.

The O’Connell development will also require a land agreement with O’Connell, which will include an extensive public approval process when presented to the City Council.  That agreement is slated to take shape in coming months.

The proposals comes as construction for the first step of downtown redevelopment, Quincy Mutual’s West of Chestnut development, is getting underway. That plan, being developed by Gate Residential, calls for a $100 million investment and 200 units of luxury housing split into two phases.

This is a developing story. More coverage in The Quincy Sun’s April 9th edition out on Wednesday.

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Sheriff Launches Program To Curb Drug Abuse

Norfolk County Sheriff Michael G. Bellotti has begun a new program to help inmates stay clean and sober after their release from jail.

The program involves the inmates being injected with the pharmaceutical drug, Vivitrol, which blocks the brain’s receptors to opiate drugs and alcohol, preventing an abuser from feeling their effects.

“During their incarceration, drug abusers go through detox. Many are clean and sober for the first time in many years. They feel healthy again while they are with us,” Sheriff Bellotti said. “The object of this program is to keep them from backsliding when they wrap up their sentences and are released back into the community. That is when they are most vulnerable. That is when the temptation is greatest.”

If an inmate agrees to participate in the program, he receives a Vivitrol injection shortly before his release back into the community. Vivitrol blocks the intoxicating effects of opiate drugs such as heroin and Oxycontin. The inmate must also agree to attend counseling sessions to support the treatment.

The injection last for four weeks, after which he can receive another dose of Vivitrol.

“We understand this is not going to end the scourge of drug addiction, but other agencies have had success with this program, and we believe it can be positive force,” Sheriff Bellotti said. “If it works as we hope, it will keep many inmates from reoffending and therefore, stop the revolving door cycle of crime. The whole point of this is to make our communities safer.”

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‘Help For Energy Hogs’ Launches In Quincy

The city of Quincy, in collaboration with National Grid and the award-winning nonprofit HEET, has launched the Help for Energy Hogs program to assist nonprofit organizations –such as preschools and community centers– lower their energy bills and fossil fuel use through upgrading outdated building equipment such as boilers.

“Many of our local nonprofits struggle with aging, inefficient energy systems and high energy bills and Help for Hogs can make a big difference in helping these organizations modernize their energy systems and save money through addressing big ticket items like outdated heating and cooling equipment,” Mayor Thomas Koch said.

The partnership will offer local organizations a unique opportunity to get major energy efficiency work completed at no up-front costs.  The work will be financed through an energy efficiency developer that recoups their investment through the energy-bill savings.  After the investment is paid off, the nonprofit can enjoy the full reductions on their energy bill.

HEET selected RENEW Energy Partners as the participating energy efficiency developer through a competitive review process.  RENEW will pay for the upgrades, as well as own, insure and maintain any measures that they install.

The upgrades would include at least $35,000 worth of work that could include a new heating system, an oil-to-gas conversion, heating systems controls, combined heat and power systems, building insulation, lighting, or other conservation measures.

To participate, Quincy-based nonprofits need to own and occupy the building. At a minimum, organizations should have an annual energy bills (heating + electricity) totaling over $15,000 and a high energy-use per square foot.  Organizations will also need to demonstrate financial stability, be willing to participate in WegoWise (an online energy monitoring site that is free through the program) and provide volunteer support to tell local small businesses –such as convenience store and laundromats– about rebates and free energy-efficiency services available to them through the state.

Audrey Schulman, President of HEET, shared that, “The goal of Help for Hogs is to help the whole community become more environmentally sustainable and economically vibrant. Fossil fuel use is reduced; nonprofits save money so they can deliver more community services, and small businesses benefit through lower energy bills.”

 

Visit www.HelpforHogs.com to learn more about the program.

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