Paul Kovalchik, 94

Paul Kovalchik, 94, of Hingham passed away Thursday, September 10, 2020.

Paul Kovalchik

Paul was born in Luzerne, PA, on February 18, 1926, the son of first-generation immigrants, George and Ann (Oravec) Kovalchik. Paul was a United States Air Force three-war veteran who served in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. Paul was a man of eternal greatness who served his country and his family with endless pride.

He is survived by his beloved wife Pauline of 64 years, a son Joseph and his wife Rose of Littleton, a daughter Karen Simeone and her husband Joseph of Stoughton, four grandchildren, Jennifer Pearlstein, Michael Simeone, Sarah Kovalchik, Nicholas Kovalchik, and one great granddaughter Mia Pearlstein. He is predeceased by eleven brothers and sisters.

Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend the visiting hours on Wednesday September 16, 2020 from 9-10:30 AM in the Keohane Funeral Home, 785 Hancock St., QUINCY prior to the Funeral Mass at Divine Mercy Parish in St. Ann’s Church, Quincy at 11 AM. Burial in Mt. Wollaston Cemetery, Quincy.

In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be made in Paul’s memory to the Dr. Ruth McLain Hospice Home, 670 Washington St., Braintree, MA, 02184.

Please see keohane.com or call 1-800-KEOHANE for online guest book and directions.

Donald Scott Deware, 60

Donald Scott Deware, 60, of Easton, formerly of Hingham, passed away on Thursday, August 27, 2020 after a lengthy battle with cancer.

Donald Scott Deware

Born in Quincy, he attended Derby Academy, Thayer Academy and Hingham High School.  He is a graduate of New England Institute, Mount Ida College, Newton, and received a degree in business management and the applied arts and sciences.

A family member of Deware Funeral Home in Quincy, as a funeral director he performed several roles during four decades of commitment: president, Deware Family Funeral Homes, Quincy; director of marketing and events, Affiliated Family Funeral Homes of New England (comprised of over ninety affiliated funeral homes in the Northeast United States and Eastern Canada and a subsidiary group of Service Corporation International (SCI) the world’s largest funeral service provider). Through SCI, Scott was especially proud of his roles as the New England director and coordinator, “Escape School,” a child abduction prevention program and the New England director and coordinator, “Smart and Safe Seniors,” a senior citizen safety program.  In this role, he personally provided presentations on staying safe and what to do if abducted or in an emergency.

The last several years have seen Scott concentrate on developing his motorsports business merger, acquisition, and investment.  He was a board member and partner, Sport Jet, LLC, is a startup private light jet company located in Colorado Springs, CO and a partner, Heritage Motorsport, LLC, a UK based company specializing in the development of motorsports virtual reality entertainment.

Scott was married to the late Melanie Jane (Lyons) Deware for eighteen years.  When they moved to Easton, they purchased the oldest house in the town, the 1717 Josiah Keith House.  He described the project as a real “love-hate relationship,” restoring the property with historical accuracy into a home both warm and educational. Melanie passed away in 2013 and during their years together they raised three girls, enthusiastically and tirelessly supporting all school and outside activities.  There thousands of miles in support of participation in the American Powerboat Racing Association New England, South Shore Outboard Association, Northeast Junior Hydroplane Racing Championships and Ski Racing competitions.  He personally built several of the hydroplanes the girls raced and put a go-kart track to race in their backyard.  A professional ski instructor, Scott shared his love of skiing.  The girls became “Junior Ski Instructors” and he watched proudly as they all earned trophies in endless racing competitions.  Scott also played ice hockey as a goalie throughout his life and was a goalie coach for the Providence College Women’s Hockey Team in the late 1970s-early 1980s.  His goalie career culminated when he played semi-professional ice hockey participating in many charity hockey games with NHL “Old Timers” and Hall of Fame players.

A former champion powerboat and auto racer, Scott won his first professional race at the age of seventeen. By the age of twenty he was already an international champion and racing veteran.  During his racing career Scott won five US National Championships and one in Canada, over fifty races and championships on the water and over twenty races on dry land.  During this time, he raced with NASCAR, Grand American Road Racing Association (Rolex Series), Sports Car Club of America, International Formula One Powerboat Association, International Outboard Grand Prix, FONDA, and the American Powerboat Association.

Scott was a 28-year member of Rural Masonic Lodge, member of Delta Lodge, past patron of Wollaston Order of Eastern Star, member of St. Chrysostom’s Episcopal Church in Quincy.   He was a member of Kiwanis International, Wollaston Council United Commercial Travelers, Taleb Grotto of Quincy, and Massachusetts Lodge #1 IOFF.   Scott was a tireless supporter of many organizations and founded and chaired organizations including: the Mary Martha Residential Learning Center (co-founder), Shriner’s Burns Hospitals, The Dream Car Foundation, The Esther Sanger Center for Compassion, The Quincy Crisis Center (past president), The Way Up Youth Program, The Committee for Immigrants and Refugees, and other organizations focused on helping children and those in need.  Scott and Melanie both dreamed of creating an organization that would be able to provide a real racing experience to physically and emotionally challenged children.  When the #18 NASCAR BUSCH Grand National North Series replica of Scott’s actual #18 NASCAR BUSCH Grand National North Series competition car made its debut it was complete with a custom passenger door and a seat that swiveled out so that a child could be placed in the car.  For several years the Dream Car Foundation fulfilled the dreams of boys and girls around New England by providing a full day at the track as a real team member highlighted by a solo ride in the Dream Car driven by Scott.

Scott is predeceased by his wife Melanie Jane (Lyons) Deware, and his parents the late Donald M. Deware and the late Mary E. Deware of Quincy.  He is survived by his children, Lily, Bethany, and Eden.  Brother of Captain Jacklyn Dewar Gallagher, USN, Retired, her husband Captain Paul C. Gallagher, USN, Retired, of Florida and nephew Chandler Scott.  Son in law of John (Jack) and Charlotte Lyons of CT; Brother in law of Michael Lyons, his wife Cheryl, Nicholas and Marisa of SC; Jay Lyons, his wife Charlene, Anthony and Jason; Erik Lyons, his wife Pamela, Brayden and Selby of CT,  Patrick Lyons, Jack and Gracie of NH.

Scott passed away surrounded by family. Just several days before he said he wanted a celebration of this incredible life, sitting where he loved, around the backyard firepit, while telling stories, laughing, singing along with old classic rock songs and lighting off fireworks.

As he requested, a “Celebration of Life” will take place on Oct. 3, 2020, complete with music and a photo collage video highlighting his life, with his wife Melanie and family, and special memories. Event Link: docs.google.com/forms/d/1Vwd1DXrFA_5AvdjHn54U0Ls8JdGm758u-YyM_bHPG5E/edit?usp=sharing_eip&ts=5f57ce43.

Funeral arrangements were made by Deware Funeral Home, 576 Hancock St., Quincy.

Massachusetts Relaxes Travel Rules For New Mexico

By SCOTT JACKSON

Bay Staters looking to travel to New Mexico can now do so without being subject to quarantine upon arrival back home. Three other states, however, have been back added to the list of restricted states.

Massachusetts has deemed New Mexico a low-risk state for COVID-19 transmission, effective Saturday. It joins 11 other states previously declared low-risk: Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Vermont, Washington and Wyoming.

Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia have all been put back on the restricted list, effective Saturday, based on increasing COVID-19 case rates. Those states had been placed on the low-risk list on Aug. 29.

Rhode Island also remains on the restricted list; the Ocean State had been on the list of low-risk states when the travel rules first went into effect on Aug. 1 but was subsequently removed.

To be designated as a lower-risk state, a state must have a positive test rate below 5 percent and fewer than six new cases per day per 100,000 residents. Both are measured on a seven-day rolling average.

Travelers from all states not on the low-risk list and any foreign country, including residents returning home, must fill out a form available at mass.gov/matraveler upon arrival in Massachusetts.

Those travelers are required to quarantine for 14 days unless they can produce a negative COVID-19 test result that was administered up to 72 hours prior to arrival in Massachusetts. Travelers would no longer be subject to the quarantine requirement if they receive a negative test result after they arrive in the state.

Those who do not comply with the requirement face a $500 fine.

People passing through the state, people commuting across state lines for work, people traveling to Massachusetts for medical treatment, people complying with military orders, or people traveling to work in federally designated critical infrastructure sectors are exempt from the state’s travel rules.

Murray J. MacInnis, 93

Murray J. “Mike” MacInnis passed away with his family by his side on Tuesday, September 8, 2020 at age 93.

Murray J. MacInnis

A lifelong Quincy resident, Mike was a WWII veteran, U.S. Navy, and before retiring had worked for the U.S. Postal Service. A devout man, he served in many capacities at Most Blessed Sacrament Church and was a member of the Morrisette Post.

The beloved husband of the late Bertha A. (Uncemach) MacInnis, Mike was the loving father of Ann Marie Affannato of Rockland, Joseph MacInnis of FL and Kerri Ann Schmok of Randolph; beloved grandfather of Amy, Sarah, Gino, Branden and Joshua; great-grandfather of CJ, Kelsey, Kylie, Kyla, Kiera, Cole, Bailey, Danny Lyn, Ally, Sophia, Christian and Emma; dear brother of the late Marie Emery, Mary-Rita Lermond, John MacInnis, Robert MacInnis and Neil MacInnis; and is also survived by many nieces and nephews.

Family and friends are invited to visiting hours which will be held with Covid restrictions, on Sunday, Sept. 13 from 2:00 to 6:00PM at the Dennis Sweeney Funeral Home 74 Elm St. Quincy Center. On Monday there will be a gathering at the funeral home at 9:00AM followed by a Funeral Mass at 10:00AM at Holy Trinity Parish, Most Blessed Sacrament Church 1015 Sea St. Quincy.

Burial with Military Honors is at Blue Hill Cemetery, Braintree.

Memorial donations may be made to Most Blessed Sacrament Church.

Alexander C. Kapolis

Alexander C. Kapolis of Wareham, originally from Quincy, died September 7, 2020.

Alexander C. Kapolis

Loving father of Michelle Bauder of Fall River, David Kapolis and his wife Victoria of Quincy, Elizabeth Arcand and her husband Albert of Pembroke and Sarah Morganelli and her husband Michael of Plymouth. Former husband of Mary (Buchan) Canatta. Son of the late Charles and Mary Kapolis. Brother of Maria Rae of Canton and James Kapolis of Milton and the late George Kapolis. Papa AL to Jordan Bauder and Austin and Ethan Arcand. Uncle of Ronald Rae and Michael & Elena Kapolis

A giving, charitable and compassionate man Alexander or “Al” as many affectionately called him, was continuously willing to give unto others both in his professional life as a contractor and in his personal life as well. Never compromising on quality, “doing it right” and presenting true artisan work, Alex exemplified what it was to be a genuine craftsman, to be emulated by many whom he heartened and impacted. He was highly skilled in all types of flooring installation, kitchen and bathroom renovations, custom additions and custom artisan work for specialty residential, commercial and industrial work. This is in addition to his uncanny ability to reverse engineer and repair plumbing, electrical, outboard engines, HVAC, internal combustion engines and countless more.

He gave Mary his wife of 24 years, four children and countless fun memories many of which were in Alton Bay, New Hampshire on Lake Winnipesaukee. He loved playing his Gibson guitars and had an affinity for classic rock. Appointed deacon in his home church, his charitable nature continued for the church congregate and surrounding communities. Alex showed a genuine passion for the Christian faith as exemplified by his benevolence towards others and his nonjudgmental and humble nature. Alex treated everyone equally and allowed no pretense or gesturing.

Alex gave hope and joy to so many. He continuously left an impression on everyone whom he met. Dad, Al and Brother Kapolis as he was affectionately called, will be sorely missed. We take comfort knowing that he is in the presence of the Lord.

Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend the visiting hours on Friday 4-8 PM in the Keohane Funeral Home, 785 Hancock St., QUINCY.

A Celebration of Life service will be held in the funeral home on Saturday at 10:30am followed by a Graveside service at Pine Hill Cemetery, Quincy at 11am.

For those who would like to make a donation, please visit Alexander Kapolis Go Fund Me at gf.me/u/yxhaqp.

High Schoolers Could Return To Classrooms Next Month

By SCOTT JACKSON

Students at Quincy’s two high schools could to return to the classroom on a part-time basis as soon as October under the re-opening timeline approved by the School Committee, nearly one month earlier than initially planned.

Wednesday, Sept. 16, will mark the first day of classes for students in grades one through twelve. Students in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten will begin classes on Monday, Sept. 21.

Students from pre-kindergarten to grade three will begin the year learning under a hybrid model with a mix of in-person and remote learning; certain high-need students at all grade levels will also receive in-person instruction. Other students in grades four through twelve will begin the year learning remotely.

Under the initial phased-in approach proposed by school officials, students in grades four through eight could have moved from remote to hybrid learning as soon as Tuesday, Oct. 13, the day after Columbus Day, with high school students making the transition as early as Monday, Nov. 9.

The School Committee on Wednesday, however, unanimously approved moving up the high school transition date to Oct. 13. An additional committee vote will be required before any grade levels can move from the remote model to the hybrid one. The committee will use public health metrics to make that decision.

Parents have the choice to opt out of the hybrid model and have their children learn remotely instead. Between 50 and 60 percent of students in pre-kindergarten to grade three will begin the year at home learning remotely.

Mayor Thomas Koch, the chairman of the committee, had suggested moving up the transition date for high schoolers. Koch said children in other countries have been able to return to class amid the coronavirus pandemic without getting sick, and also expressed concerns about students’ social and emotional wellbeing if remote learning continues too long.

“I think the lookback on all of this a year or two out is going to be far more damaging on the mental health side, the social side. I’m really concerned about that,” he said.

“Also, under the law, our teachers and staff are reporters when they observe things. And these kids don’t all come from perfect homes and that is the opportunity when there has to be an intervention because something is occurring. We’ve been missing out on that too.”

The mayor said health officials have learned since March that precautions that would be in place in schools, such as wearing masks, frequent hand washing and distancing requirements, can slow the spread of the virus.

“We know that this works,” Koch said, holding up a mask. “We know washing the hands works. We know social distancing works.”

Koch also noted Quincy has been designated as a green, or low-risk, community by the Department of Public Health since mid-August; green communities have an average daily case rate of fewer than four per 100,000 residents in the last two weeks. He asked Health Commissioner Ruth Jones if the high school transition date could be moved up in light of that.

Jones said it could be possible for all students in grades four through twelve to move from remote to hybrid on the same date provided the health metrics support doing so at the time.

“If the data continues in the direction it’s going, from a public health perspective I think that could be a possibility,” Jones said.

Superintendent Kevin Mulvey noted the initial phase-in plan had been created earlier in the summer while Quincy was a yellow, or moderate-risk, community, and said the committee could consider moving high schoolers to the hybrid model sooner because the case rate in the city has improved since then.

“Since we’ve been in the green for a month, which is excellent…that’s certainly something the School Committee could consider,” Mulvey said.

The committee on Wednesday also approved the metrics that will be used to determine if students can transition from remote to hybrid. Those same metrics will also be used to decide whether students need to move from hybrid to fully remote.

The metrics require Quincy to be designated a green community or an unshaded by the DPH in order for the committee to consider transitioning more students to the hybrid model; unshaded communities have fewer than five total active cases.

Other metrics will include the number of cases among residents ages 18 and under the city, the number of cases among Quincy Public Schools students and staff, the number of QPS students with cases in their household, and data from communities where school teachers and staff reside. Jones will compile that information into a chart that will be color coded in the same manner as the DPH maps.

Patricia A. McKenna, 86

Patricia A. McKenna of Quincy passed away on Saturday, September 6, 2020 at age 86.

A lifelong Quincy resident, she worked at Quincy City Hospital before retiring.

The daughter of the late Walter and Isabel (Smollett) McKenna, Patricia is survived by her nieces, nephews, grand nieces and grand nephews.

Family and friends are invited to a visiting hour on Friday, September 11 from 9:00 to 9:30AM at the Dennis Sweeney Funeral Home 74 Elm St. Quincy Center.

A Funeral Mass will follow at 10:00AM at Divine Mercy Parish, St. Mary’s Church 115 Crescent St. W. Quincy.

Burial is at St. Mary’s Cemetery.

Francis Hogan

Francis Hogan of Quincy, formerly Milton, died September 7, 2020.

Francis Hogan

Francis adored his family and his dog Rusty. He enjoyed traveling, collecting stamps, and was great at historical trivia and known as the “trivia king.” Francis proudly worked for Filene’s Basement for over 38 years as a stock associate.

He was a quiet, kind, and good hearted man who will be greatly missed by all who knew him.

Son of the late James J. and Mary Hogan (Dunning). Loving brother of Agnes Donovan and her husband John of Plum Island, Newbury, James J. Hogan Jr. MSP and his late wife Patricia of Lynn, and Eileen Hogan and her friend Al Mignosa of Rockland.

Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend the visiting hours on Friday 9-10 AM  in the Keohane Funeral Home, 785 Hancock St., QUINCY followed by the Funeral Mass in St. Joseph’s Church, Quincy at 10:30 AM.

Burial in Mt. Benedict Cemetery, Boston.

Memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

Forbes W. Kelley Jr

Forbes Woodhull Kelley Jr. died peacefully Sept. 1 at his home in Quincy.

Forbes W. Kelley Jr.

Skip, as he was known to his friends and family, was the son of Col. Forbes W. Kelley (U.S. Army) and Ruth T. Kelley (U.S. Navy Nurse Corps).  He was born in California while his parents were on active duty there in 1945 and later moved to Hingham where he attended school. The family was a summer resident of Boothbay Harbor, Maine.

Mr. Kelley continued his education at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla., after being discharged from the U.S. Army.

After serving in Korea and discharged, he continued his education at Northeastern University obtaining degrees in computer engineering, both hardware and software. Upon graduation, Mr. Kelley worked for several computer companies and became a contact for President Jimmy Carter for computer problems.  Later he attended Harvard where he earned several degrees in environmental and economic areas. He joined the American Legion and was a member of the Harvard Club of Boston and Harvard Faculty Club.

Mr. Kelley was predeceased by his parents and survived by his cousins.

Memorial donations may be made to the Ronald McDonald Home.

Memorial services are not planned at this time.

Arrangements were made by Downing Cottage Funeral Chapel, Hingham.

Robert Harnais Nominated Associate Justice Of MA District Court

Local attorney Robert W. Harnais has been nominated as an associate justice of the Massachusetts District Court by Gov. Charlie Baker.

If confirmed by the Governor’s Council, Harnais would fill the seat vacated by the Honorable Dominic J. Paratore.

Robert Harnais

Harnais began his legal career in 1991 as an Associate for the Law Office of John Shorton in Roxbury, a general litigation firm where he represented clients in matters including personal injury, criminal, and care and protection cases in District and Juvenile Court. Previously, he served as a Probation Officer for the Quincy District Court from 1984 until 1988, and as an Investigator for the Massachusetts Department of Revenue from 1988 until 1990.

In 1993, Attorney Harnais formed Mahoney & Harnais in Quincy, a general practice firm where he remains a Partner and handles matters ranging from criminal and civil litigation to real estate conveyance and municipal permitting. Since 1999, he has also served as General Counsel for the Norfolk County Sheriff’s Office, and was Acting Norfolk County Sheriff from October 2018 until December 2018.

Attorney Harnais is a member and past president of numerous professional organizations, including the Massachusetts Bar Association (President 2015 – 2016), the Massachusetts Association of Hispanic Attorneys (President 2004 – 2006), and the New England Bar Association (President 2016 – 2017). He has also served as Chairman of the Braintree Planning Board since 2008, and as Vice Chair of the Governor’s Latino Advisory Board since 2017. Attorney Harnais earned his Juris Doctorate from New England School of Law and his Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Massachusetts Boston.

The District Court hears a wide range of criminal, civil, housing, juvenile, mental health, and other types of cases. District Court criminal jurisdiction extends to all felonies punishable by a sentence up to 5 years, and many other specific felonies with greater potential penalties, all misdemeanors, and all violations of city and town ordinances and bylaws. In civil matters, District Court judges conduct both jury and jury-waived trials, and make final determinations on any matter where the likelihood of recovery is no more than $50,000 (for cases commenced on or after January 1, 2020). The District Court also tries small claims involving up to $7,000 (initially tried to a magistrate, where the defense has a right of appeal either to a judge or a jury).