Baker-Polito Administration Announces Federal Disaster Declaration for COVID-19 Response

In response to Governor Charlie Baker’s request for federal disaster assistance, the White House and FEMA announced March 28 that  President Donald Trump has issued a Major Disaster Declaration that will make federal disaster assistance available beyond what was included in the Emergency Declaration declared by President Trump on March 13.

Public Assistance Program – Under FEMA’s Public Assistance Program within the Major Disaster Declaration, affected local governments, state agencies and certain private non-profit organizations statewide will be reimbursed for 75% of their costs associated with response and emergency protective measures. The eligible emergency protective measures include non-congregate isolation and quarantine costs for homeless individuals and families as well as first responders as well as other types of properly documented costs.

Individual Assistance Program – Under FEMA’s Individual Assistance Program within the Major Disaster Declaration, Crisis Counseling Assistance will provide funding for the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health to assist individuals and families in recovering from the psychological effects of the COVID -19 outbreak through electronic phone and chat technology.

The Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency will provide webinars and other information about the process for applying for the Public Assistance Program to municipal and state officials and eligible non-profits. See here for more information.

President Trump Approves Massachusetts Disaster Declaration 

President Donald J. Trump has declared that a major disaster exists in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and ordered Federal assistance to supplement Commonwealth, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic beginning on January 20, and continuing.

The President’s action makes Federal funding available for Crisis Counseling for affected individuals in all areas in the State of Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Federal funding is also available to Commonwealth, tribal, and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations for emergency protective measures, including direct Federal assistance, for all areas in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts impacted by COVID-19.

Pete Gaynor, Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Department of Homeland Security, named W. Russell Webster as the Federal Coordinating Officer for Federal recovery operations in the affected areas.

Additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the Commonwealth and warranted by the results of further assessments.

COVID-19 Claims The Lives Of 3 Quincy Residents; Number Of Cases Here Now 43

The COVID-19 pandemic has claimed the lives of three Quincy residents and the number of cases – including presumptive and confirmed – in the city has increased to 43, according to an update released by the City of Quincy March 26.

One of the new cases in Quincy is reported to be a Quincy firefighter.

Nine residents have recovered from the coronavirus.

The number of cases state-wide stands at 2,417 as of March 26. The state also announced March 26 that 25 people have died from COVID-19 including 10 new deaths – the largest number of deaths in Massachusetts reported in a single day, as the number of tests grew by 3,827 people since March 25.

What You Need to Know:

  • Governor Charlie Baker has issued an executive order to further extend the closure of all Massachusetts schools and all non emergency child care programs until May 4, 2020.
  • A temporary emergency order has been issued that prohibits the use of reusable bags until further notice. Retailers will provide bags free of charge during this time.
  • Governor Charlie Baker ordered all non-essential businesses to close no later than noon on Tuesday, March 24. The order does not apply to grocery stores, pharmacies and many other services deemed essential. For a full list of essential services included in the Governor’s order, please click here.
  • The Governor also reduced the maximum number of group assemblies to 10 people, down from 25. Additional guidance on that order, can be found here.
  • A Wollaston Elementary School Grade 5 teacher, who was last in school on March 12, has tested positive for COVID-19. In a letter to Grade 5 parents, Superintendent Richard DeCristofaro asked that children in the class self-isolate in their home until March 26 as a precaution, based on the recommendation from Health Commissioner Ruth Jones.
  • All day-care facilities except Exempt Emergency Childcare Centers to serve families of first-responders and front-line medical personnel are closed.
  • City offices are closed to the public. The City will still operate and offices will still be staffed, but residents will be required to conduct business via telephone, the Internet or through the mail. No emergency services will be impacted. For a full list of department phone numbers and contact information, please click here.
  • All playgrounds in Quincy are closed, but park spaces are open.
  • Students can pick up “Grab and Go” meals at North Quincy High School, Quincy High, Snug Harbor and Lincoln-Hancock. Meals will be available from 11 AM to noon. Additional details are available on QPS website.  To visit the site, please click here.
  • All restaurants and bars in Quincy are not allowed to serve food or beverages on site.
  • Any gathering should maintain “social distancing” meaning people stay further six feet away from each other at all times.
  • All public regulatory boards are postponed until at least April 7.
  • All public facilities will continue to undergo aggressive environmental cleaning on a daily basis.
  • Mayor Koch will use $1 million from the City’s Affordable Housing Trust to assist workers in the City’s hospitality industry and maintain their housing during prolonged closures. The full details of the program will be developed in the coming days.

Best Practices

  • Residents in potentially vulnerable populations, such as seniors and those with underlying medical conditions, are advised to stay home.
  • Many of the things you do to help prevent colds and the flu can help protect you against other respiratory viruses such as Coronavirus:
    • Avoid large gatherings.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds.
    • Cover your coughs and sneezes.
    • Stay home if you are sick. If you are ill call your healthcare provider for instructions before going to a clinic, office or emergency room.
  • There are currently no vaccines available to protect against this novel coronavirus infection. It is not recommended that people wear masks when they are in public. Masks can be useful in some settings, such as a clinic waiting room, to prevent someone who has a respiratory illness from spreading it to others. There is no hard evidence that wearing a mask protects the wearer outside of the healthcare setting.
  • Don’t flush Disinfecting Wipes, Paper Towel or Flushable Wipes down your toilet.  They can clog sewer lines and cause plumbing issues in your home.

Need More Information?

  • Ruth Jones
    Health Commissioner
    (617) 376-1272
    rjones@quincyma.gov
  • City of Quincy COVID-19 Informational Hotline
    (617) 376-1288
  • Mayor’s Office of Constituent Services
    (617) 376-1500

MA DPH Announces 10 More Deaths From COVID-19; Number Of Cases 2,417

State health officials Thursday (March 26th) announced 10 additional deaths from COVID-19, the largest number of deaths in Massachusetts reported in a single day, as the number of tests grew by 3,827 people since yesterday.

These 10 people are:

  • Male, 50s, Essex County, preexisting conditions, hospitalized
  • Male, 80s, Essex County, preexisting conditions, hospitalized
  • Male, 80s, Middlesex County, unknown preexisting conditions, hospitalized
  • Male, 70s, Middlesex County, preexisting condition, hospitalization status under investigation
  • Male, 80s, Hampden County, unknown preexisting conditions, hospitalization status under investigation
  • Male, 90s, Suffolk County, preexisting conditions, hospitalized
  • Male, 80s, Worcester County, preexisting conditions, hospitalized
  • Female, 70s, Norfolk County, preexisting conditions, hospitalization status under investigation
  • Male, 80s, Franklin County, unknown preexisting conditions, hospitalization status under investigation
  • Female, 80s, Middlesex County, preexisting conditions, hospitalized

These deaths bring to 25 the total number of deaths from the novel coronavirus in Massachusetts.

As of 4 p.m. March 26, Massachusetts has 579 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 for a total of 2,417 cases.  A total of 23,621 Massachusetts residents have been tested for COVID-19 by the State Public Health Laboratory, commercial and clinical labs, a jump of more than 3,827 since yesterday. The DPH daily online dashboard reflects testing results for 20 clinical and commercial labs performing testing in Massachusetts in addition to results from the State Public Health Laboratory.

Expanded testing capacity in Massachusetts continues to be a focus of the work of the COVID-19 Response Command Center, and the effort to increase testing capacity across the state will continue.

The 25 people who have died ranged in age from 50s to 90s. They include residents from Middlesex, Suffolk, Norfolk, Worcester, Hampden, Berkshire, Essex, Barnstable, and Franklin counties.

COVID-19 activity is increasing in Massachusetts. At this time, if people are only mildly symptomatic, they should speak to their healthcare provider about whether they need to be assessed in person. If not, they should stay at home while they are sick. Asymptomatic family members should practice social distancing and immediately self-isolate if they develop symptoms.

In the United States, there have been more than 68,440 cases of COVID-19 and more than 994 deaths, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In Massachusetts and nationwide, the public is being asked to avoid crowds, stay 6 feet away from others, not shake hands or hug, and call/Facetime and online chat with friends and loved ones rather than meet face to face.

To keep updated regarding COVID-19 in Massachusetts, residents can text “COVIDMA” to 888-777 to receive COVID-19 text message alerts straight to their phone.  More information about COVID-19 can be found at www.mass.gov/covid19. For general questions, a 24/7 hotline is available by calling 2-1-1.

Baker-Polito Administration Announces Federal Disaster Request, Other COVID-19 Response Efforts

The Baker-Polito Administration announced Thursday (March 26) a new request to the federal government for a Major Disaster Declaration, in addition to other actions to sustain the Commonwealth’s response to COVID-19.

If approved, this declaration would provide the Commonwealth additional federal assistance beyond what was included in the Emergency Declaration declared by President Trump on March 13. The disaster declaration request includes a request for FEMA’s Public Assistance Program, which would make financial assistance available to cities and towns, state agencies, and certain non-profits statewide. The disaster declaration request also requests FEMA’s Individual Assistance Program including Disaster Unemployment Assistance and Crisis Counseling Assistance to help support residents in need during this unprecedented incident.

Read the Letter.

  New Public Health Orders: The Department of Public health has issued three emergency orders to support the health care system’s response to COVID-19:

  • Pharmacy Practice: To ensure pharmacists are able to fully support the health care system’s response to COVID-19, this emergency order makes several changes regarding pharmacy practice, including expedited approval for pharmacists licensed in other states to practice in Massachusetts, and allowing the remote processing of prescriptions by pharmacy technicians. Read the Order
  • Determination of Need: This emergency order exempts health care facilities from the requirement that they submit a Notice of Determination of Need for certain activities that will support their response to COVID-19. Read the Order | Read the Guidance
  • Nurse Staffing: To ensure hospitals have the flexibility they need to respond to the COVID-19 outbreak, this emergency order exempts hospitals from certain nurse-staffing requirements, while requiring that they must ensure that staffing levels remain adequate to meet patients’ needs, and staff is trained and competent to meet the needs of their patients. Read the Order

 Permit Order: Governor Baker today is issuing an emergency order that provides that a permit will not expire or lapse during the state of emergency for most permits issued by agencies within the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs and the Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development. The order also pauses deadlines for these agencies to decide or hold hearings on permit applications. The clock on those deadlines will resume 45 days after the end of the emergency. It also ensures that no permit is automatically issued because an agency is unable to make a decision on a permit application during the emergency.

Ensuring Access to Personal Care Attendant Services: The Administration worked with the advocacy community and union partners to implement solutions to ensure access to Personal Care Attendant (PCA) services for individuals with disabilities and older adults during this public health emergency. MassHealth created a hotline through MassOptions for MassHealth members to call if they are in need of services, and updated its policies to streamline the hiring process and allow more flexibility for PCAs to work more hours.

March 26th Edition Of The Quincy Sun Online

Due to the coronavirus health emergency, this week’s edition of The Quincy Sun was not published in print. However, pages have been posted to The Quincy Sun website. The link to the website is below.

We hope to return to a normal printing schedule for our April 9th edition. Again, we apologize for the disruption in our print edition. Hope our readers will visit the digital version of The Sun on the website.

The Sun will continue to post updates on the coronavirus from the state and city for the foreseeable future.

Other local news including obituaries will also be posted on the Sun website.

To access this week’s edition, visit:

thequincysun/this-weeks-issue

City of Quincy COVID-19 Update March 25: 36 Quincy Cases, One Death

As of March 25, there were 36 confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 in Quincy according to an update released by the city. Of that number, 8 people have recovered and one man in his 80’s has died from contracting the virus.

Statewide as of March 25, there are 1,838 cases including presumptive and confirmed. State officials also announced four more fatalities due to COVID-19 bringing the total to 15 state-wide. These include a male in his 80s from Norfolk County, preexisting conditions, hospitalized; male, 80s, Barnstable County, preexisting conditions, hospitalized; male, 70s, Worcester County, unknown preexisting conditions, hospitalized; and a woman in her 70s, Worcester county, preexisting conditions, hospitalized.

County-wise, the most reported cases are in Middlesex (446), Suffolk (342) and Norfolk (222).

What You Need to Know: 

  • Governor Charlie Baker has issued an executive order to further extend the closure of all Massachusetts schools and all non emergency child care programs until May 4, 2020.
  • A temporary emergency order has been issued that prohibits the use of reusable bags until further notice. Retailers will provide bags free of charge during this time.
  • Governor Charlie Baker ordered all non-essential businesses to close no later than noon on Tuesday, March 24. The order does not apply to grocery stores, pharmacies and many other services deemed essential. For a full list of essential services included in the Governor’s order, please click here.
  • The Governor also reduced the maximum number of group assemblies to 10 people, down from 25. Additional guidance on that order, can be found here.
  • A Wollaston Elementary School Grade 5 teacher, who was last in school on March 12, has tested positive for COVID-19. In a letter to Grade 5 parents, Superintendent Richard DeCristofaro asked that children in the class self-isolate in their home until March 26 as a precaution, based on the recommendation from Health Commissioner Ruth Jones.
  • An elderly man with underlying medical conditions is the City’s first fatal case of COVID-19. There are a total of 17 cases of COVID-19 involving Quincy residents and 5 patients have recovered. Testing numbers remain uncertain, so the day-to-day reporting may not reflect the full spread of the virus.
  • All day-care facilities except Exempt Emergency Childcare Centers to serve families of first-responders and front-line medical personnel are closed.
  • City offices are closed to the public. The City will still operate and offices will still be staffed, but residents will be required to conduct business via telephone, the Internet or through the mail. No emergency services will be impacted. For a full list of department phone numbers and contact information, please click here.
  • All playgrounds in Quincy are closed, but park spaces are open.
  • Students can pick up “Grab and Go” meals at North Quincy High School, Quincy High, Snug Harbor and Lincoln-Hancock. Meals will be available from 11 AM to noon. Additional details are available on QPS website.  To visit the site, please click here.
  • All restaurants and bars in Quincy are not allowed to serve food or beverages on site.
  • Any gathering should maintain “social distancing” meaning people stay further six feet away from each other at all times.
  • All public regulatory boards are postponed until at least April 7.
  • All public facilities will continue to undergo aggressive environmental cleaning on a daily basis.
  • Mayor Koch will use $1 million from the City’s Affordable Housing Trust to assist workers in the City’s hospitality industry and maintain their housing during prolonged closures. The full details of the program will be developed in the coming days.

Best Practices 

  • Residents in potentially vulnerable populations, such as seniors and those with underlying medical conditions, are advised to stay home.
  • Many of the things you do to help prevent colds and the flu can help protect you against other respiratory viruses such as Coronavirus:
    • Avoid large gatherings.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds.
    • Cover your coughs and sneezes.
    • Stay home if you are sick. If you are ill call your healthcare provider for instructions before going to a clinic, office or emergency room.
  • There are currently no vaccines available to protect against this novel coronavirus infection. It is not recommended that people wear masks when they are in public. Masks can be useful in some settings, such as a clinic waiting room, to prevent someone who has a respiratory illness from spreading it to others. There is no hard evidence that wearing a mask protects the wearer outside of the healthcare setting.
  • Don’t flush Disinfecting Wipes, Paper Towel or Flushable Wipes down your toilet.  They can clog sewer lines and cause plumbing issues in your home.

Need More Information?

  • Ruth Jones
    Health Commissioner
    (617) 376-1272
    rjones@quincyma.gov
  • City of Quincy COVID-19 Informational Hotline
    (617) 376-1288
  • Mayor’s Office of Constituent Services
    (617) 376-1500

 

Baker Orders All MA Schools, Non-Emergency Child Care Programs Closed Until May 4

The Baker-Polito Administration announced Wednesday (March 25) new actions to support the ongoing COVID-19 response, including extending the closure of all public and private schools and non-emergency child care programs and steps to protect homeowners and low-income tenants from eviction and foreclosure. The Department of Public Health (DPH) also issued an order relative to pharmacies and grocery stores.

Schools and Non-Emergency Child Care Programs: Governor Charlie Baker issued an emergency order extending the closure of all public and private schools, and all non-emergency childcare programs, until May 4 in an effort to prevent the further spread of COVID-19 in the Commonwealth.

  • This order expands on previous orders issued on March 15 and March 18 suspending normal educational operations at schools and non-emergency child care programs until April 6, and the Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) established a process to approve Exempt Emergency Child Care Programs to serve vulnerable children and families of first responders and essential workers.
  • This closure extends one week beyond scheduled spring vacation week on most school district calendars.
  • The order does not apply to residential special education schools.
  • This extension will allow school administrators and educators added planning time to ensure students can complete course requirements, as well as provide teachers with time to expand remote learning opportunities.

Read the Orders here: K-12 School Order | Early Education School Order

Remote Learning and Education: During this time, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) is requesting that educators continue to develop and assemble high-quality educational materials to provide students with effective remote learning resources through the month of April. The Department is also creating a model for districts to use and modify in collaboration with local stakeholders to fit their school district’s needs, and will continue to work with schools to identify best practices for implementing effective remote learning.

Remote learning encompasses a wide variety of learning methods, including both analog and online. While technology is an excellent tool, districts should also consider ways students can continue to learn offline.

This could include exploring nature, activities to support students’ local communities (with appropriate social distancing) and engaging in hands-on projects and artistic creations that stem from students’ experiences.

Additionally, through a new partnership between DESE and WGBH, educational resources will be posted on the department’s website, and middle and high school students can access WGBH and WGBY educational programming on WGBH and WGBY on the WORLD channel from noon to 5 p.m.

Housing Stability for Vulnerable Populations: The Baker-Polito Administration announced steps to keep vulnerable families in their homes, preserve the health and safety of low-income renters and homeowners, and prevent homelessness due to reduced or lost income. These steps include the following:

  • DHCD is moving to temporarily suspend terminations of federal and state rental vouchers under their purview.
  • MassHousing is transferring $5 million to the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) for a COVID-19 Rental Assistance for Families in Transition (RAFT) fund to assist families facing rent insecurity.
  • The Division of Banks (DOB) has issued new guidance to Massachusetts financial institutions and lenders urging them to provide relief for borrowers and will advocate for a 60-day stay on behalf of all homeowners facing imminent foreclosure on their homes.
  • DHCD is issuing guidance recommending that all owners of state aided low-income housing, including Local Housing Authorities and private owners, suspend both pending non-essential evictions and the filing of any new non-essential evictions.
  • Affordable housing operators are urged to suspend non-essential evictions for loss of income or employment circumstances resulting in a tenant’s inability to make rent.
  • This guidance urges operators to establish reasonable payment plans, notify Section 8 or public housing residents about interim income recertification to adjust rent payments, and to consider offering relief funding for residents ineligible for income reassessment.

Read the DHCD Guidance Here:

Guidance to owners of state aided low-income housing

Guidance to affordable housing operators

Notices and guidance regarding federal and state rental assistance programs:

Read the DOB Guidance Here.

Pharmacies and Grocery Stores: Today, DPH issued a new order to support pharmacies and grocery stores and their employees during the COVID-19 public health emergency. This order will require grocery stores and pharmacies to:

  • Provide at least one hour per day of shopping for adults over 60-years-old.
  • Offer sanitation options, such as hand sanitizer and disinfecting wipes, as available, to clean shopping carts and points of frequent contact.
  • Appropriate social distancing policies, including a marked “Social Distancing Line,” beginning six feet away from all checkout counters.
  • Close any self-serve food stations.
  • Instruct store employees who are ill to stay home, and for stores to accommodate employees who fall in the high-risk category with alternative assignments to limit exposure.

Read the Order Here.

The Administration will continue to update the public on further developments and individuals are encouraged to consult both the Department of Public Health and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention websites for the most up to date information.

The latest information and guidance regarding COVID-19 is always available at mass.gov/COVID19.

 

COVID-19 Deaths In Massachusetts Rises To 9; Victims Include Quincy Man In His 80s

Two females, both in their 70s and from Essex and Worcester counties, and two men –  one in his 60s from Suffolk County and the other in his 80s from Norfolk County – have died from COVID-19-related illness, bringing the total number of deaths from the novel coronavirus in Massachusetts to nine. All four were hospitalized and had underlying health conditions.

The man in his 80s from Norfolk County who has died from the virus was a Quincy resident.

As of 4 p.m. Monday, March 23, 8,922 Massachusetts residents have been tested for COVID-19 by the State Public Health Laboratory and commercial and clinical labs, up from 6,004 residents on Sunday. Of those 8,922 people, 777 have tested positive.  For the first time, testing results for all of the clinical and commercial labs performing testing in Massachusetts is posted, in addition to results from the State Public Health Laboratory, on its COVID-19 online dashboard.

Monday’s case numbers reflect additional testing being performed in Massachusetts by several additional labs. In addition to the State Public Health Laboratory, Quest Diagnostics, and LabCorp, the online dashboard includes 10 more labs and their testing data.  Expanded testing capacity in Massachusetts continues to be a focus of the work of the COVID-19 Response Command Center, and the effort to increase testing capacity across the state will continue.

The nine people who died ranged in age from 50s to 90s. Three of the six men were from Suffolk County, the other three from Norfolk, Hampden, and Berkshire counties. The three women were from Worcester, Essex, and Middlesex counties.

COVID-19 activity is increasing in Massachusetts. At this time, if people are only mildly symptomatic, they should speak to their healthcare provider about whether they need to be assessed in person. If not, they should stay at home while they are sick. Asymptomatic family members should practice social distancing and immediately self-isolate if they develop symptoms.

In the United States, there have been more than 33,400 cases of COVID-19 and more than 400 deaths, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In Massachusetts and nationwide, the public is being asked to avoid crowds, stay 6 feet away from others, not shake hands or hug, and call/Facetime and online chat with friends and loved ones rather than meet face to face.

More information about COVID-19 can be found at www.mass.gov/covid19. For general questions, call 2-1-1.

City Of Quincy COVID-19 Update March 23: Quincy Man Dies From Virus

The following information and update on the COVID-19 outbreak was provided by The City of Quincy on Monday, March 23:

What You Need to Know:

  • Governor Charlie Baker ordered all non-essential businesses to close no later than noon on Tuesday, March 24. The order does not apply to grocery stores, pharmacies and many other services deemed essential. For a full list of essential services included in the Governor’s order, please click here.
  • The Governor also reduced the maximum number of group assemblies to 10 people, down from 25. Additional guidance on that order, can be found here.
  • A Wollaston Elementary School Grade 5 teacher, who was last in school on March 12, has tested positive for COVID-19. In a letter to Grade 5 parents, Quincy School Supt. Richard DeCristofaro asked that children in the class self-isolate in their home until March 26 as a precaution, based on the recommendation from Health Commissioner Ruth Jones.
  • An elderly man with underlying medical conditions is the City’s first fatal case of COVID-19. There are a total of 17 cases of COVID-19 involving Quincy residents and 5 patients have recovered. Testing numbers remain uncertain, so the day-to-day reporting may not reflect the full spread of the virus.
  • As of March 23, the state reported 9 fatalities due to the coronavirus and 777 confirmed cases of the virus. Of that number, 232 are from Middlesex County, 154 from Suffolk County and 82 from Norfolk County.
  • All day-care facilities except Exempt Emergency Childcare Centers to serve families of first-responders and front-line medical personnel are closed.
  • City offices are closed to the public. The City will still operate and offices will still be staffed, but residents will be required to conduct business via telephone, the Internet or through the mail. No emergency services will be impacted. For a full list of department phone numbers and contact information, please click here.
  • All playgrounds in Quincy are closed, but park spaces are open.
  • Per Governor Baker’s order, all schools in Quincy remain closed through April 7.
  • Students can pick up “Grab and Go” meals at North Quincy High School, Quincy High, Snug Harbor and Lincoln-Hancock. Meals will be available from 11 AM to noon. Additional details are available on QPS website.  To visit the site, please click here.
  • All restaurants and bars in Quincy are not allowed to serve food or beverages on site.
  • Any gathering should maintain “social distancing” meaning people stay further six feet away from each other at all times.
  • All public regulatory boards are postponed until at least April 7.
  • All public facilities will continue to undergo aggressive environmental cleaning on a daily basis.
  • Mayor Koch will use $1 million from the City’s Affordable Housing Trust to assist workers in the City’s hospitality industry and maintain their housing during prolonged closures. The full details of the program will be developed in the coming days.

Best Practices

  • Residents in potentially vulnerable populations, such as seniors and those with underlying medical conditions, are advised to stay home.
  • Many of the things you do to help prevent colds and the flu can help protect you against other respiratory viruses such as Coronavirus:
    • Avoid large gatherings.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds.
    • Cover your coughs and sneezes.
    • Stay home if you are sick. If you are ill call your healthcare provider for instructions before going to a clinic, office or emergency room.
  • There are currently no vaccines available to protect against this novel coronavirus infection. It is not recommended that people wear masks when they are in public. Masks can be useful in some settings, such as a clinic waiting room, to prevent someone who has a respiratory illness from spreading it to others. There is no hard evidence that wearing a mask protects the wearer outside of the healthcare setting.

More Resources

Residents with questions can call the Mayor’s Office of Constituent Services at 617-376-1500 or the Quincy Health Department at 617-376-1272.